The Club Scene (1992)

After a bizarre incident, Frank Harris is transported into the cartoon realm of Cool World, where he remains the only human among various animated characters for years. Eventually, artist Jack Deebs also enters Cool World and sets his lustful sights on his own creation, a blond bombshell named Holli Would. However, excessive intermingling between cartoons and humans is said to lead to dire consequences, a risk Jack seems ready to take.

Hugh Harman, Rudolf Ising & Friz Freleng (1929)

Sinkin’ in the Bathtub is the first Warner Bros. theatrical cartoon short as well as the very first of the Looney Tunes series. The title is a pun on the 1929 song Singin’ in the Bathtub.


The short was produced, directed, supervised and co-animated by Harman and Ising, with animation by a very young Friz Freleng and his friends. Leon Schlesinger was credited as an associate producer, and the title card also gave credit to the Western Electric apparatus used to create the film.

Jan Ć vankmajer (1982)

Three surreal depictions of failures of communication that occur on all levels of human society.

Dimensions of Dialogue is a 1983 Czechoslovak animated short film directed by Jan Ć vankmajer. It is 14 minutes long and created with stop motion.

Terry Gilliam selected the film as one of the ten best animated films of all time.

2018 Official Trailer


Tito is a shy 10-year-old boy who lives with his mother. Suddenly, an unusual epidemic starts to spread, making people sick whenever they get scared. Tito quickly discovers that the cure is somehow related to his missing father’s research on bird song. He embarks on a journey to save the world from the epidemic with his friends. Tito’s search for the antidote becomes a quest for his missing father and for his own identity.

Discover more about the film here: https://shoutstudios.shoutfactory.com/tito-and-the-birds/

Brothers Quay (1991)

A three-minute animated choreography with an ethereal pop soundtrack by the remarkable band called His Name Is Alive. With a typically eccentric cast of a ragged doll, a white rabbit and a manic ping-pong ball, the Quays construct a hypnotic, beguiling, and vaguely menacing ballet—something like a music video made by Max Ernst. In beautifully textured black & white, ARE WE STILL MARRIED? is a small work, but it is as accomplished and unforgettable as their very best.

– Brothers Quay (1988)

The first film of the STILLE NACHT series, initially commissioned as an MTV Art Break, is a gorgeous black and white reverie about iron filings.

DRAMOLET is part of the Quay Brothers’ STILLE NACHT series which includes ARE WE STILL MARRIED? (STILLE NACHT II), TALES FROM THE VIENNA WOODS (STILLE NACHT III) and CAN’T GO WRONG WITHOUT YOU (STILLE NACHT IV).

The Quays’ familiar puppet animation is here enhanced by the use of animated iron filings, which suggest the rapid formation of frost over every surface, the swaying of the individual particles suggesting a hefty buffeting by a keen, piercing wind.

Brothers Quay (1986)

Click here to watch The Street of Crocodiles: http://www.totalshortfilms.com/ver/pelicula/251

The Street of Crocodiles is a 21-minute-long stop-motion animation short subject directed and produced by the Brothers Quay and released in 1986.

The Street of Crocodiles was originally a short story written by Bruno Schulz, from a story collection published under that title in English translation. Rather than literally representing the childhood memoirs of Schulz, the animators used the story’s mood and psychological undertones as inspiration for their own creation.

Brothers Quay (1984)

The Cabinet of Jan Svankmajer is a 1984 British surreal short stop-motion film by the Quay Brothers, an homage to the influential short filmmaker Jan Ơvankmajer.

This early film by renowned animators the Quay Brothers is structured as a series of little lessons in perception, taught by a puppet simulacrum of Jan Svankmajer, whose head is an opened book, to a doll whose head the master empties of dross and refills with a similar open book. Each of the nine segments or chapters “refers variously to the importance of objects in Svankmajer’s work, their transformation and bizarre combination through specifically cinematic techniques, the extraordinary power of the camera to ‘make strange’, the influence of Surrealism on Svankmajer’s work, and the subversive and radical role of humor. Taken out of the context of the original Visions television documentary on Svankmajer, for which they served as illustration/commentary, these vignettes might at first sight seem a trifle bewildering. They ideally need to be viewed more than once before they begin to work effectively as quirky introductions to the Svankmajer universe. Then, however, they emerge as surprisingly charming and delightful excursions into this astonishing (and often deeply disturbing) directors work.” –Julian Petley

Brothers Quay (1983)

LeoĆĄ Janáček: Intimate Excursionsis a short experimental documentary that attempts to find visual references in the correspondence of Leos Janacek, the Czechoslovak composer.

LeoĆĄ Janáček was a Czech composer, musical theorist, folklorist, publicist and teacher. He was inspired by Moravian and other Slavic folk music to create an original, modern musical style.[

Until 1895 he devoted himself mainly to folkloristic research. While his early musical output was influenced by contemporaries such as AntonĂ­n Dvoƙák, his later, mature works incorporate his earlier studies of national folk music in a modern, highly original synthesis, first evident in the opera JenĆŻfa, which was premiered in 1904 in Brno. The success of JenĆŻfa (often called the “Moravian national opera”) at Prague in 1916 gave Janáček access to the world’s great opera stages. Janáček’s later works are his most celebrated. They include operas such as KĂĄĆ„a KabanovĂĄ and The Cunning Little Vixen, the Sinfonietta, the Glagolitic Mass, the rhapsody Taras Bulba, two string quartets, and other chamber works. Along with AntonĂ­n Dvoƙák and Bedƙich Smetana, he is considered one of the most important Czech composers.

– Brothers Quay (1983)

Igor: The Paris Years, one segment of a larger biographical program created for Channel 4 on the life and times of Igor Stravinsky, finds the brothers working in a slightly different vein than the one that would come to characterize their later work. This is the first section, which covers the pianist’s “French period” from roughly 1920-1939, and it details, among other things, his connection with Jean Cocteau (who, as a matter of fact, contributes voice work to this project). Filtered through gonzo and impressionistic puppetry (often bearing strong resemblance to the work of Terry Gilliam), the film takes an unconventional and often beautiful stab at the television biography special.

Brothers Quay (1980)

Following Punch and Judy from their malevolent medieval personas through their much-mollified assimilation into English folklore, this film finally restores the odd couple to their rightful roles as hair-raising anarchists. It is a stunning mixture of mime, mask, painting, crudely animated documents and mischievously reanimated newsreels, as well as the demonic atonalities of a modernist opera by Harrison Britwistle brought to “life” in a puppet fantasy/nightmare.