Barnaby Dixon (2009)

A tale of how two “disgrega workers” react to the presence of a wild animal in their workshop.

Barnaby Dixon is a puppeteer, animator, musician, singer, YouTube star, and social media personality from Britain. He has garnered fame through his self-titled YouTube channel, on which he posts his puppet performances. His ongoing comedy/vlog series with a bird puppet named Dabchick has brought him widespread recognition.

Barnaby Dixon is a producer and director, known for Once Upon a Time in a Shed (2013), Eskos (2009), and The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance (2019).

Michal Struss (1998)

Stop-motion puppet animated short film written and directed by Michal Struss.

A character is inside a cubical room; there is a hole in the roof, which is too high to reach. But pushing on the walls distorts the room in various ways, always appearing to bring the hole closer while still leaving it tantalizingly inaccessible.

Michal Struss graduated from the Department of Film and Television at the Academy of Performing Arts in Bratislava, majoring in animation. His stop–motion animation picture In the Box was nominated for a Student Academy Award. He worked on animation, visual effects, and post– production of Blind Loves (Slepé lásky, 2008), Blue Tiger (Modrý tiger, 2011), and Deadly Stories (Smrteľné history, 2016). He was nominated for the Czech Lion for Blue Tiger in the category of best production design.

Slick Rick (1994)

Music video by Slick Rick performing Behind Bars. (C) 1994 The Island Def Jam Music Group.

Behind Bars is the third studio album by British-American rapper Slick Rick, released November 22, 1994, on Def Jam Recordings. The album features production from Vance Wright, Pete Rock, Large Professor, Easy Mo Bee, and Warren G, as well as guest appearances by Doug E. Fresh, Nice & Smooth, and Warren G.

Wolfgang & Christoph Lauenstein (1989)

Balance is a German surrealist stop-motion animated film, released in 1989.
It was directed and produced by twin brothers Wolfgang and Christoph Lauenstein.

A group of fishermen on a precariously balanced platform fight over a trunk.

The setting is on a floating platform where a group of evenly and carefully placed men live. Each man is aware that the platform is not stable and in order not to fall to their deaths, they maintain a careful balance of weight to prevent the platform from tipping too far and cause them all to fall. This reasonably harmonious understanding is lost when one man pulls up a heavy trunk. In the ensuing struggle, balance is lost in more than one sense.

Dušan Kastelic (2021)

In a strange, dark box lives a group of box-headed elderly humanoid creatures with roots instead of legs. Most of these creatures are sunken into a catatonic sleep, unaware of anything outside their hermetic, sealed-off world.

But one of them emerges from the crowd, stunned into consciousness. Young and growing, the creature starts to cause a joyful ruckus, but struggles against the disapproval and rancor of the rest of his box-dwellers. But then the youngster begins to fight back, looking for a way outside the box but coming against its most oppressive forces yet.

Writer/director/animator Dusan Kastelic’s short animation is a surreal yet exuberant allegory about the pleasures and perils of non-conformity, being an individual and pushing through obstacles to a new level of consciousness.

The narrative takes the phrase “outside the box” and spins it into a deeply imaginative, hypnotic narrative that resembles a fairy tale. Not a sanitized children’s version of a fairy tale, however: the film instead resembles the original European fairy stories, which were dark, psychologically complex and disquieting in their emotional violence.

The images are nightmarish, with their evocations of distorted flesh and murky colors. But the expressiveness of the creatures and attention to detail — created in open-source 3-D software Blender — are remarkable from a technical and emotional level, and draw in viewers with a powerful combination of gesture, sound and storytelling.

Despite the claustrophobic world portrayed in the film, there are splashes of zany humor and joy, particularly as the younger creature expresses its unbridled childlike self. The musical score and sound design by Mateja Staric go a long way to create contrast between stultifying conformity and youthful individualism, as well as keeping the narrative at a consistently engaging pace.

Despite its strange appearance, the uninhibited joyousness and high spirits of the newly emergent creature are so much like the energy of children, and viewers cannot help but relate. Yet “The Box” becomes genuinely sad and painful as the youngster is repeatedly brought down and cut down to size, and confronts the mechanisms of the box itself that keep its inhabitants docile and in the dark.

Watching that struggle becomes a powerful metaphor for the oppression and conformity that we all face, whether it’s the box that society puts us inside or the ones we put ourselves in. To watch the creature struggle against a dark, narrow world is hard, and yet, as the creature discovers, as long as you can feel a spark of an essential self, there is always a way towards the light.

M83 (2011)

Monologue: Zelly Meldal-Johnsen

Anthony Gonzalez: “When I was a kid, I had this cassette with someone telling these weird stories on it, and I was in love with it. My brother and I wrote the story for that song based on those cassettes. With that song, I wanted to start with something so ridiculous and basic and childish that then grows to something very touching and human. It’s dangerous, but if you listen to it in the context of the album, it makes sense. There’s always one song on my albums that people hate. I feel like that’s going to be the case for this album, too. [laughs]”

Pitchfork: “Who’s the little girl on that song?”

Anthony Gonzalez: “She’s Justin’s (Justin Meldal-Johnsen, a producer on the album) five-year-old daughter. She’s amazing, a born actress. The first time I met her, she talked to me for 30 minutes non-stop: ‘Anthony, I had this dream.’ I didn’t know her, and she was talking to me like I was a friend.”

*animator unknown🙁

Mike Judge (2017)

Mike Judge Presents: Tales from the Tour Bus is an American animated documentary television series created by Mike Judge, Richard Mullins, and Dub Cornett that premiered on September 22, 2017 on Cinemax.

The raucous adventures of musicians such as Johnny Paycheck, Jerry Lee Lewis, George Jones, and Tammy Wynette, as told by those who knew them best. Season 2 covers the legends of funk.

Hobo Moon

She walks with me in my dreams,
and loves me true, so it seems,
but upon awake she is not there,
she is with someone else without a care.


I have loved her for many years,
and cried far too many tears.
The time has come that I told
of the feelings for her that I hold.


Always running in a different direction.
Never very good at showing affection.
This time I’ll do it right.
I’ll tell her under the starry moonlight.


Stay with me girl, just for a while.
You know you always make me smile.
Walk with me along the sand,
and don’t let go of my hand.


This love for you is very real.
Please tell me how you feel.
If you just want a friend
I’ll stick with you until the end.

Fleischer Studios (1930)

Seymour Kneitel along with Dave Fleischer directed this animated short film, but was uncredited.

Screen Songs are animated cartoons featuring the famous “bouncing ball” produced by Max Fleischer and distributed by Paramount Pictures between 1929 and 1938. The cartoons are sing-alongs featuring popular song hits of the day along with the ethnic stereotypes and humor typical of the era in which they were produced. In the 1930s, the series began to feature current popular musical guest stars such as Cab Calloway, Rudy Vallee, and Ethel Merman.

Fleischer Studios was an American corporation that originated as an animation studio located at 1600 Broadway, New York City, New York. It was founded in 1921 as Inkwell Studios, Inc. and Out of the Inkwell Films by brothers Max Fleischer and Dave Fleischer who ran the pioneering company from its inception until Paramount Pictures, the studio’s parent company and the distributor of its films, acquired ownership. In its prime, Fleischer Studios was a premier producer of animated cartoons for theaters, with Walt Disney Productions becoming its chief competitor in the 1930s.

Fleischer Studios characters included Koko the Clown, Betty Boop, Bimbo, Popeye the Sailor, and Superman. Unlike other studios, whose characters were anthropomorphic animals, the Fleischers’ most successful characters were humans (with the exception of Bimbo, who was a black-and-white cartoon dog). The cartoons of the Fleischer Studio were very different from the Disney product, both in concept and in execution. As a result, the Fleischer cartoons were rough rather than refined, consciously artistic rather than commercial. But in their unique way, their artistry was expressed through a culmination of the arts and sciences. This approach focused on surrealism, dark humor, adult psychological elements, and sexuality. Furthermore, the environments were grittier and urban, often set in squalid surroundings, reflecting the Great Depression as well as German Expressionism.

The Fleischer Brothers (1930)

I’m Afraid to Go Home in the Dark is a 1930 animated short film which is presented by Max Fleischer and was directed by Dave Fleischer. The film, which was originally released by the film company Paramount Pictures, features a sing-along version of the song “I’m Afraid to Come Home in the Dark”, which was written by Egbert Van Alstyne and Harry Williams and was originally published in 1907.

The film also features an early prototype of Bimbo, the same that was used in the Fleischer cartoon Hot Dog, which was released in the same year.

Copyright on January 30, 1930, and released the same day, the film is part of the “Follow the bouncing ball” series entitled Screen Songs. These films would invite the audience to sing the song featured in them.

Nick Cross (2020)

CONTENT WARNING: Contains flashing imagery, cartoon violence, and sexuality.

The Clockwork Elves could be a pyschotropic exploration of spirituality and death, or it could be a tale of a little goofball hopped up on goofballs. Either way, it’s a cartoon.

Directed and animated by Nick Cross

Music composed by Mike Fraumeni [ASCAP] and Sarah Whittaker-Gilbert [ASCAP]

Published by NSLE Music [ASCAP]

Music courtesy of Elias Music

This film was made single-handedly by Nick Cross over the span of about 7 years. Animated in Toon Boom Animate Pro with post work done in Adobe After Effects. Backgrounds painted in Adobe Photoshop.

Nick Cross (2012)

For more information on this and other films by me, visit: My website: http://nick-cross.com

WTF did you just watch? Perihelion is a sort of animated tone poem. It is a short film that toes the line between narrative and non-narrative, essentially having no real beginning, middle, or end.

Visually, I was heavily inspired by the work of a number of German painters from the early 20th century. Notably: Otto Dix, Richard Oelze, Ingrid Griebel-Zietlow, Rudolf Schlichter, and Max Ernst, as well as Francisco Goya. This is sort of a tribute to the work of these artists living in a time of Fascism and impending war, which really informed their work in a distinct way.

Nick Cross

Story, art, and animation by Nick Cross (nickcrossanimation.com)

Audio samples courtesy of Freesound.org

Special thanks to alphadog, szuhogyisziszi, Sampleconstuct, Timbre, martian

Animated with a Cintiq 20 WSZ using Toonboom Animate

Backgrounds painted in Adobe Photoshop

Compositing and effects were done in Adobe After Effects

Editing was done in Final Cut Pro

Completed March 23, 2012

Picture Book 1936

Komatsuzawa Hajime (1934)

Very little information exists pertaining to this short animation.

Mickey Mouse is represented here as something completely different:

Pure American imperialist evil.

At least he does in this 1934 animated propaganda cartoon Omochabako series dai san wa: Ehon senkya-hyakusanja-rokunen (Toybox Series 3: Picture Book 1936) by Komatsuzawa Hajime. It’s a convoluted title, but pretty simple in plot. An island of cute critters (including one Felix the Cat clone) is attacked from the air by an army of Mickey Mouses (Mickey Mice?) riding bats and assisted by crocodiles and snakes that act like machine guns. The frightened creatures call on the heroes of Japanese storybooks and folk legends to help them, from Momotaro (“Peach Boy”) and Kintaro (“Golden Boy”) to Issun-boshi (“One Inch Boy”) and Benkei, a warrior monk, to send Mickey packing. The not-so-subtle message: Mickey Mouse may be your hero, America, but our characters are older, more numerous, and way more beloved. Our pop culture is older than yours!

Peter Foldès (1973)

In this animated short, director Peter Foldès depicts one man’s descent into greed and gluttony. Rapidly dissolving and ever-evolving images create a contrast between abundance and want. One of the first films to use computer animation, this satire serves as a cautionary tale against self-indulgence in a world still plagued by hunger and poverty.

Ed Catmull & Fred Parke (1972)

This clip was eventually discovered by a Hollywood producer and incorporated into the 1976 movie Futureworld.

This historical video was recently re-discovered after being lost for many years. It was produced in 1972 and is believed to be the world’s first computer-generated 3D animation. It was created by Ed Catmull, a true pioneer of 3D technology, who was a computer scientist at the University of Utah and founder of Pixar.