Guido Manila (1977)

Animated science fiction film based on biblical stories.

Guido Manuli is one of the most influential Italian animators and film directors. He started a long-standing collaboration with animation legend Bruno Bozzetto in the 60s; together they worked on cult movies like West and Soda, Vip Mio Fratello Superuomo, Allegro Non Troppo and many more.

In 1991 he won the Davide of Donatello Award for Best Screenplay for the Maurizio Nichetti-directed Volere Volare, a mixed technique feature film also awarded with the Globo d’Oro of International Critic, the Premio Corbucci for Best Italian Movie 1990 and finally the Best Film and Audience Award in Montreal. Later in the 90s he directed for the Italian pubcaster RAI the TV movie Monster Mash, followed by the theatrical feature Aida degli Alberi in 2001 (a Lanterna Magica production) and the full CGI animated series Water and Bubbles for RAI in 2008/2009.

During the last 40 years he also created dozens of short films that won scores of accolades worldwide. Works such as Opera (1973), Fantabiblical (1977), Count Down (1978), Just a Kiss (1983) and Incubus (1985) were screened and widely acclaimed at every major animation Festival: from Annecy to Trieste, Parigi and Lucca. His energetic style was often compared to Tex Avery.

Francine Desbiens & Bretislav Pojar (1981)

Under the guise of a pretty fairy tale, this animated short makes a strong political statement. Animated paper cut-outs enact a drama in which a dictator imposes his delusions on his unfortunate subjects. The humour is black and, despite the absence of dialogue, the message is crystal clear.

A giant statue of the letter “E” arrives in the park. One man sees it as “B”; they are preparing to cart him off to the looney bin when a doctor arrives and determines the man needs glasses. Then the king arrives; he also sees “B”. He tries on the glasses, sees “E”, and pins a medal on the doctor then has his goon squad come and bash on everyone’s head until they too see “B”.

The School of Life (2016)

I’m proud to say that Ralph Waldo Emerson is an ancestor of mine on my mom’s side of the family. Ralph Waldo Emerson taught us about the presence of nature and something a little divine inside all of us. He was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, abolitionist, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and his ideology was disseminated through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.

Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of transcendentalism in his 1836 essay Nature. Following this work, he gave a speech entitled The American Scholar in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. considered to be America’s “intellectual Declaration of Independence.”

Fleischer Studios (1935)

Betty flies to Japan to do a show, and sings the title number. She then dons a kimono, and sings it again in Japanese.

Got a language all my own known in every foreign home! You surely know it is Boop-Doopy-Doopy-Doo-Boop-Oopy-Doop-Bop!

Betty Boop

Betty Boop flies to Japan and takes her stage act on the road, and plays to great acclaim, and sings the title number “A Language All My Own” in both English and Japanese. After singing to a cheering New York audience, Betty sets off in her plane for the Land of the Rising Sun, depicted literally as such with an emblematic sunrise over Mt. Fuji. When Betty arrives in Japan she sings for her cheering Japanese fans.

Mae Questel as Betty Boop

Animation by Myron Waldman and Hicks Lokey

Music by Sammy Timberg

Bruno Bozzetto & Guido Manuli (1973)

Lines uttered in all freedom, all joined by a common theme, that is music; from classical to opera music nothing escapes the irreverent and hilarious film’s criticism.

Most of Opera is busy mocking classic opera scenes, but towards its close it turns into social satire, and represents the self-destruction of the world.

Guido Manuli is one of the most influential Italian animators and film directors of his time. He started a long-standing collaboration with animation legend Bruno Bozzetto and together they worked on cult movies like West and Soda, Vip Mio Fratello Superuomo, Allegro Non Troppo, and many more. In 1991 he won the Davide of Donatello Award for Best Screenplay for Volere Volare, a mixed technique feature film. Later in the 90s he directed the TV movie Monster Mash, followed by the theatrical feature Aida degli Alberi in 2001 and the CGI animated series Water and Bubbles in 2008/’09. During the last 40 years he also created dozens of short films that won scores of accolades worldwide. Works such as Opera (1973), Fantabiblical (1977), Count Down (1978), Just a Kiss (1983), and Incubus (1985) were screened and widely acclaimed at every major animation Festival. His energetic style was often compared to Tex Avery.

Bruno Bozzetto is an Italian cartoon animator and film director, creator of many short pieces, mainly of a political Hiii or satirical nature. He created his first animated short “Tapum! the weapons’ story” in 1958 at the age of 20. His most famous character, a hapless little man named “Signor Rossi”, has been featured in many animated shorts as well as starring in three feature films: Mr. Rossi Looks for Happiness, Mr. Rossi’s Dreams, and Mr. Rossi’s Vacation.

Trey Parker & Matt Stone (1999)

Happy Pride Month!

“Bombs are flying, people are dying, children are crying, politicians are lying, too. Cancer is killing,
Texaco’s spilling, the whole world’s gone to hell, but how are you? I’m super! Thanks for asking.”

Big Gay Al

Big Gay Al is a stereotypical homosexual man who first appeared in the Season One episode, Big Gay Al’s Big Gay Boat Ride. He is known for his flamboyant and positive demeanor and usually responds to the greeting “How are you?” with an upbeat “I’m super! Thanks for asking!”

At the USO show before the troops entered the American-Canadian War, Big Gay Al started the song I’m Super at the request of Stan Marsh and Kyle Broflovski, who needed a distraction so The Mole could free Terrance and Phillip.

Bigger, Longer & Uncut is a 1999 American adult animated musical comedy film based on the animated sitcom South Park. Directed by series creator Trey Parker, the film stars the regular television cast of Parker, series co-creator Matt Stone, Mary Kay Bergman, and Isaac Hayes, with George Clooney, Eric Idle, and Mike Judge in supporting roles. The screenplay, written by Parker, Stone, and Pam Brady, follows Stan Marsh and his friends Kyle Broflovski, Eric Cartman and Kenny McCormick as they sneak into an R-rated film starring their idols, Canadian comedy duo Terrance and Phillip, and begin swearing incessantly. Eventually, their mothers pressure the United States to wage war against Canada for allegedly corrupting their children, giving Stan, Kyle, and Cartman no choice but to unite the other children, fight their own parents, and rescue Terrance and Phillip, while Kenny tries to stop a prophecy involving Satan and Saddam Hussein’s plot to conquer the world.

South Park is an American animated sitcom created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone and developed by Brian Graden for Comedy Central. The series revolves around four boys — Stan Marsh, Kyle Broflovski, Eric Cartman, and Kenny McCormick — and their exploits in and around the titular Colorado town.

Lily Allen & Olivia Rodrigo (2022)

Olivia Rodrigo performs Fuck You (feat. Lily Allen) at Glastonbury 2022.

As American musicians took the stage at Glastonbury 2022, many used their stage time to criticize the United States supreme court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Olivia Rodrigo surprised her audience by bringing out artist Lily Allen for a special duet of Allen’s song Fuck You while addressing the devastating news. During her speech before introducing Allen, Rodrigo dedicated the song to the five members of the supreme court.

“I wanted to dedicate this next song to the five members of the supreme court who have showed us that at the end of the day, they truly don’t give a shit about freedom. This song goes out to the justices samuel alito, clarence thomas, neil gorsuch, amy coney barrett, and brett kavanaugh. We hate you!”

Olivia Rodrigo
Olivia Rodrigo at Glastonbury ’22

Look inside, look inside your tiny mind
Then look a bit harder
‘Cause we’re so uninspired, so sick and tired
Of all the hatred you harbour
So you say it’s not okay to be gay
Well, I think you’re just evil
You’re just some racist who can’t tie my laces
Your point of view is medieval

Fuck you! fuck you very, very much
‘Cause we hate what you do
And we hate your whole crew
So please, don’t stay in touch
Fuck you! fuck you very, very much
‘Cause your words don’t translate
And it’s getting quite late
So please, don’t stay in touch

Do you get, do you get a little kick out of being small minded?
You want to be like your father, it’s approval you’re after
Well, that’s not how you find it
Do you, do you really enjoy living a life that’s so hateful?
‘Cause there’s a hole where your soul should be
You’re losing control of it
And it’s really distasteful

Fuck you! fuck you very, very much
‘Cause we hate what you do
And we hate your whole crew
So please, don’t stay in touch
Fuck you! fuck you very, very much
‘Cause your words don’t translate
And it’s getting quite late
So please, don’t stay in touch

You say you think we need to go to war
Well, you’re already in one
‘Cause it’s people like you that need to get slew
No one wants your opinion

Lily Allen at Glastonbury ’22

Fuck you! fuck you very, very much
‘Cause we hate what you do
And we hate your whole crew
So please, don’t stay in touch
Fuck you! fuck you very, very much
‘Cause your words don’t translate
And it’s getting quite late
So please, don’t stay in touch

FUCK YOU!

Amy Winfrey & Joanna Calo (2018)

Diane divorces Mr. Peanutbutter and moves into a shabby studio. Feeling melancholy, she travels to Vietnam to get away from it all.

“The real reason you go to Vietnam is because you accidentally see your soon to be ex-husband kiss someone else. At first you think, Oh, it’s a fling. Whatever. They’re drunk. It’s a party. But then he puts his hand on the small of her back exactly the way he used to do to you. It means I got you, and when he did it to you, it made you feel safe. And you realize he’ll never do that to you again. And it breaks your heart again. After your heart was so broken that you thought it could never get any more broken.”

– Diane Nguyen

BoJack Horseman is an American adult animated tragicomedy sitcom created by Raphael Bob-Waksberg. It stars the voices of Will Arnett, Amy Sedaris, Alison Brie, Paul F. Tompkins, and Aaron Paul.

Bruno Bozzetto (1967)

By restraining the whole cycle of life into just six minutes, the film underlines how our constant commitments often mislead us from the real meaning of life.

Bruno Bozzetto is an Italian cartoon animator and film director, creator of many short pieces, mainly of a political Hiii or satirical nature. He created his first animated short “Tapum! the weapons’ story” in 1958 at the age of 20. His most famous character, a hapless little man named “Signor Rossi”, has been featured in many animated shorts as well as starring in three feature films: Mr. Rossi Looks for Happiness, Mr. Rossi’s Dreams, and Mr. Rossi’s Vacation.

Bruno Bozzetto abozzetto.com

Alex Toth (1966)

Space Ghost is a Saturday morning superhero cartoon produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. It first aired on CBS from September 10, 1966, to September 16, 1967. The series was composed of two unrelated segments, Space Ghost and Dino Boy in the Lost Valley. The series was created by Alex Toth and directed by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera.

Space Ghost, along with teenaged sidekicks Jan and Jace and their pet monkey Blip, fight villains in outer space. Usually, Space Ghost’s sidekicks would get captured or trapped by the villains, and Space Ghost would have to defeat the villains and save the day. His enemies included Zorak, Brak and his brother Sisto, the Creature King, the Black Widow (a.k.a. the Spider Woman), Lokar, Moltar, and Metallus.

“Saturday-morning cartoon” is a colloquial term for the original animated series programming that was typically scheduled on Saturday and Sunday mornings in the United States on the “Big Three” television networks

Raphael Bob-Waksberg & Aaron Long (2020)

Nice While It Lasted is the series finale of the animated comedy-drama series BoJack Horseman. Written by series creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg and directed by Aaron Long, it was released on January 31, 2020.

Bojack Horseman is arrested for breaking and entering, but is granted a furlough to attend the wedding of his ex-girlfriend, Princess Carolyn. The episode was widely praised as a poignant ending to the series.

Patrick Smith (1985)

“There’s a way we talk and it includes profanity. We never figured we’d be arrested for it.”

– Mike D

Interview by Rocci Fisch for ABC News Radio 1985, Washington, D.C. Cassette Tape

More Beasties: http://blankonblank.org/interviews/be…

Executive Producer: David Gerlach

Animator: Patrick Smith

Beastie Boys were an American rap group from New York City, formed in 1981. The group was composed of Michael “Mike D” Diamond, Adam “MCA” Yauch, and Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz. Beastie Boys were formed out of members of experimental hardcore punk band the Young Aborigines in 1978, with Diamond as vocalist, Jeremy Shatan on bass guitar, John Berry on guitar, and Kate Schellenbach on drums. When Shatan left in 1981, Yauch replaced him on bass and the band changed their name to Beastie Boys. Berry left shortly thereafter and was replaced by Horovitz.

Vitist https://beastieboys.com/ for more Beastie Boys!

Mike Judge (2022)

In perhaps the dumbest space movie ever made, Beavis and Butt-head are sentenced to Space Camp by a “creative” judge in 1998, leading to a trip on the Space Shuttle, with predictably disastrous results. After going through a black hole, they reemerge in our time, where they look for love, misuse iPhones, and are hunted by the Deep State. Spoiler: They don’t score. Beavis and Butt-Head Do the Universe is streaming June 23 exclusively on Paramount+.

Beavis and Butt-Head Do the Universe is an upcoming animated science fiction comedy film based on the MTV animated television series Beavis and Butt-Head. Written, directed by and starring series creator Mike Judge, it is the second film adaptation of the animated series and a sequel to Beavis and Butt-Head Do America.

Animation services for the film were provided by Titmouse, Inc, making it the first official Beavis and Butt-Head animation done with Adobe Animate.

Aardman Animations (1982)

A real radio presenter provides the voice for his animated counterpart, a weary soul who doesn’t let a small thing like hosting a radio show get in the way of his morning routine…

Commissioned by Channel 4 in 1982, Conversation Pieces allowed Peter Lord and Dave Sproxton to develop ideas aimed at a more sophisticated, adult audience. The 5-minute shorts also gave birth to a device that has become an Aardman trademark – matching animated characters to real-life dialogue.

Aardman Animations, Ltd. is a British animation studio based in Bristol, England. It is known for films made using stop-motion clay animation techniques, particularly those featuring its Plasticine characters Wallace and Gromit, Shaun the Sheep, and Morph.

Learn more about Aardman Animations by visiting https://www.aardman.com/about/

James Brown & Betty Jean Newsome (1966)

Animated music video by James Brown performing It’s A Man’s Man’s Man’s World

Directed by Xavier Fauthoux

The world may be run and operated by men, but without women, none of it would be possible.

It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World is a song written by James Brown and Betty Jean Newsome. Brown recorded it on February 16, 1966, in a New York City studio and released it as a single later that year. It reached No. 1 on the Billboard R&B chart and No. 8 on the Billboard Hot 100. Its title is a word play on the 1963 comedy film It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

The song is written in the key of E-flat minor. The lyrics attribute all the works of modern civilization to the efforts of men, but claim that it all would “mean nothing without a woman or a girl”. Brown’s co-writer and onetime girlfriend, Betty Jean Newsome, wrote the lyrics based on her own observations of the relations between the sexes. Newsome claimed in later years that Brown did not write any part of the song, and she argued in court that he sometimes forgot to pay her royalties.

Animation Department

Marion Brunettoanimator
Thomas Buroncharacter designer
Martial CoulonCompositing
Matthieu Fouchieranimator
Liza Lussiezcharacter designer
Milan Starcevicanimator
Alexandre Tissotconcept art

Norman McLaren (1950)

This 1949 animation by Canadian filmmaker Norman McLaren is a moving vision of jazz activity. Featuring a soundtrack by the Oscar Peterson Trio the film ebbs and flows in unison with the energy of the performers. This is the explosion of color you’ve been waiting to hear.

Norman McLaren was a Scottish Canadian animator, director and producer known for his work for the National Film Board of Canada (NFB). He was a pioneer in a number of areas of animation and filmmaking, including hand-drawn animation, drawn-on-film animation, visual music, abstract film, pixilation and graphical sound.

His awards included an Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject in 1952 for Neighbours, a Silver Bear for best short documentary at the 1956 Berlin International Film Festival for Rythmetic and a 1969 BAFTA Award for Best Animated Film for Pas de deux.

Drew Christie (2016)

Find out how the scent of a woman inspired Kurt Cobain to write an anthem for the ages.

The Nirvana song Smells Like Teen Spirit is associated with a story of Bakini Kill’s lead singer Kathleen Hanna who wrote “Kurt Smells Like Teen Spirit” all over his motel wall. This was a reference to Bakini Kill’s drummer Tobi Vail who dated Kurt and wore Teen Spirit deodorant, implying that Tobi had marked Kurt with her scent. He later learned that it was a brand of deodorant after the single was released, having originally interpreted the slogan as having revolutionary meaning.

Directed by Drew Christie

Written by Drew Christie and Bill Flanagan

Narrated by T Bone Burnett

Chuck Jones (1943)

“Confidentially, those hunters couldn’t hit the broad side of a DUCK!”

– Daffy Duck

To Duck or Not to Duck is a 1943 Warner Bros. Looney Tunes cartoon directed by Chuck Jones. The cartoon was released on March 6, 1943, and stars Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd.

Allen Ginsberg (1956)

In celebration of Allen Ginsberg’s birthday, born on this day in 1926, I present to you Howl, the best-known poem produced by the literary movement called the Beat Generation—not to mention one of the most controversial and influential poems of the 20th century. Dedicated to Ginsberg’s friend Carl Solomon, who had been confined to a psychiatric institution, the poem is a lament for “the best minds of [Ginsberg’s] generation,” whom it portrays as having been “destroyed by madness.” But it’s also a tribute to rebellious artists, thinkers, and hipsters and an attack on the oppressiveness of western society, something it depicts as crushingly conformist, greedy, and violent. With affectionate sympathy, the poem ultimately suggests that the “mad” rebels are really the only sane exceptions to the insane culture of 20th-century America. Written in 1954-’55 and published in Howl and Other Poems (1956), “Howl” became an instant literary sensation and the target of censorship for its graphic language and sexual themes. Its victory in a 1957 obscenity trial paved the way for the publication of other controversial literature in the 1950s and ’60s.

The film is written and directed by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman and stars James Franco as Ginsberg.

Lost in Industrialization:
A “Howl” for Freedom

Imagine a world in which industry controls the way in which you live, forcing you to sacrifice originality in the name of a commercial society. Unfortunately, this is a sad reality for those of us born into industrialized civilizations. Oppressed, controlled by the media, and led astray, Americans lose touch with themselves and their dreams as they cling desperately to an industrialized society that is not concerned for the plight of the individual, but rather for the growth and wealth accumulation of such a society. The American government is ignorant to the desires of individual thinkers and feel that people should work together to achieve this industrialized mad house we call home. Allen Ginsberg’s poem, “Howl,” explores this ignorance and addresses the issues concerning the role of the individual American. Throughout the 1940s and 1950s, the Beatnik era in America brought forth poets who wrote poetry in response to the rise of bigotry, crimes against the innocent, and the loss of faith in the national government. They wrote about homosexual sex, drug abuse, and other topics concerning the individual. Of this Beat Generation, Allen Ginsberg’s poem caused an incredible amount of controversy, but changed the world of poetry forever. While Allen Ginsberg plunges into his own downward spiral toward madness, he exposes a world responsible for oppressive conformity, the evils of industrialized civilization, and the state of the individual as an effect of industrialization.

We are instantly introduced to the greatest minds of the Beat generation torn apart by the madness caused by oppressive conformity and materialism. Ginsberg was a firsthand witness, and casualty to this madness, to which he says, “I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked, / dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix, / angelheaded hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night” (1-3). Ginsberg uses a rhythmic style in his poetry to paint a vivid picture of his friends and their adventures across America. He is communicating scenes, characters, and situations drawn from his own personal experience, describing his fellow travelers, the crazy, lonely members of his community of misunderstood poets, artists, novelists, jazz musicians, psychotics, political radicals, pranksters, sexual deviants, and junkies. He had written this in response to the loss of his friends, who had either been mentally broken or killed by the system, to which he mentions, “who distributed Supercommunist pamphlets in Union Square weeping and undressing while the sirens of Los Alamos wailed them down, and wailed down Wall, and the Staten Island ferry also wailed, / who broke down crying in white gymnasiums naked and trembling before the machinery of other skeletons” (32-33). This is a description of the people Ginsberg knew and the events of their lives. We get an indication that their spirits have been broken or destroyed by a force, which remains unnamed in the first section of the poem. They could not help but to be destroyed by their discovery of a manipulative governmental system that would not allow anyone to live outside of the rules and regulations that it set. This caused many of these Beatniks to be driven to insanity or suicide by their inability to live in the modern world and their inability to escape from it.

It is relatively apparent that the rhythm of Ginsberg’s poem was influenced by the jazz musicians of his generation. Jazz represented an unaccepted form of music. It was an African-American style of music not listened to by the majority of middle-class whites, to which Ginsberg says, “and rose reincarnate in the ghostly clothes of jazz in the goldhorn shadow of the band and blew the suffering of America’s naked mind for love into an eli eli lamma lamma sabacthani saxophone cry that shivered the cities down to the last radio” (77). Jazz music represented filth and bad behavior. The beaten down had inhabited jazz music because of their isolation and status as outcasts from respectable society, much like the African-Americans who performed it. The first section of the poem is structured as a single run-on sentence divided into breaths. Each line represents a single breath. This is what gives the poem a jazzy feel and a bop refrain, which Ginsberg uses to symbolize the separation of his beaten down friends from the evils of modern society.

The first section of the poem gives way to the second part, which is an expression of anger and frustration directed to the governmental powers that feel it necessary to oppress the masses of American society. It addresses the state of industrial civilization by the use of Moloch, the Canaanite fire god who accepted children as sacrifice, to which Ginsberg writes, “What sphinx of cement and aluminum bashed open their skulls and ate up their brains and imagination? / Moloch! Solitude! Filth! Ugliness! Ashcans and unobtainable dollars! Children screaming under the stairways! Boys sobbing in armies! Old men weeping in the parks!” (79-80). We can see right away that the “best minds” of his generation have been sacrificed to Moloch. Moloch represents modern society and the sacrifice of our individual freedom and expression. Moloch is the modern industrial state of the country to which Ginsberg mentions, “Moloch whose mind is pure machinery! Moloch whose blood is running money!” (83), and again when he says, “Moloch whose poverty is the specter of genius!” (85). We can see through the use of Moloch that Ginsberg feels that the American government places low wages on industrial workers so that those who dictate the lives of the beaten down Americans can live in greater luxury. However, Moloch does not take these things by force. Moloch represents the model American family, which sacrifices pleasure and personal freedom in order to feel a sense of normalcy, to which Ginsberg states, “Robot apartments! invisible suburbs! skeleton treasuries! blind capitals! demonic industries! spectral nations! invincible madhouses! granite cocks! monstrous bombs! / They broke their backs lifting Moloch to Heaven! Pavements, trees, radios, tons! lifting the city to Heaven which exists and is everywhere about us!” (88-89). We get a sense that these families have either willingly or unknowingly sacrificed their freedoms for the purpose of elevating the power of the American government. This power leads to a corrupt management of civilization, which creates boundaries between classes and individuals. We also get a sense that the corrupt powers that Moloch represents is indeed inescapable because Moloch surrounds us throughout society. Unfortunately, it is this inability to escape from the corrupt clutches of Moloch that causes individual thinkers to plunge into a world of insanity.

Ginsberg writes of insanity in his poem and uses Carl Solomon to express this madness. Solomon, whom Ginsberg met while he was institutionalized, is driven mad because society builds structures and institutions that keep him from expressing himself through art, to which he mentions, “Carl Solomon! I’m with you in Rockland where you’re madder than I am” (95). We get an indication that Rockland is a Psychiatric ward by way of mentioning that Carl is madder than he is. Though the third section is a turning point away from Moloch, it is also symbolizes the destructive properties which Moloch represents. Although this section of the poem shows the effect of what Moloch has caused, it also ends on a hopeful note, which we see when Ginsberg mentions, “we wake up electrified out of the coma by our own souls’ airplanes roaring over the roof they’ve come to drop angelic bombs the hospital illuminates itself imaginary walls collapse O skinny legions run outside O starry-spangled shock of mercy the eternal war is here O victory forget your underwear we’re free” (129). This suggests that though the industrialized institutions of America may expect us to sacrifice ourselves for their own personal benefit, we control our own fate. We do not have to be a prisoner to this system of industry. We can tear down the walls that keep us bound within ourselves, and live our own lives free from the expectations of a cold, inhuman industrialized government.

In the end, Ginsberg realizes that the madness of his friends and other beaten down citizens is the cause of industrial America. As he plunges into the mouth of madness, he exposes a side of America that is responsible for oppressive conformity, the evils of an industrial civilization, and the madness directly related to this industrialization. His fear of being condemned to a life of insanity turns into a hopeful prayer to those of us who live among the bottom rungs of society. He shows us that it is possible to live among a society, which seems artificial and unnatural, and still be free to be ourselves. Unfortunately, this poem does not share the same ending of self-discovery for all Americans. Though many of us have discovered our own personal happiness, there remains a larger portion of the population that sacrifices themselves for the benefit of the system. They do not know how to tear down their own walls, which keep them bound within themselves. Perhaps this poem should be a message to Americans to speak out against the system when we do not agree with the unnatural restrictions set against humans. Once each individual discovers themselves within themselves, only then will each of us be truly free.

Written by Hobo Moon

Nassos Vakalis (2014)

A sociopolitical metaphor of the world as a formal dinner that takes an unexpected turn when there’s no more food to be served.

During dinner, “the system” feeds the few who consume all the resources while the rest survive on scraps. Inevitably, the struggle for what remains leads to catastrophic change. The offspring of this transition turns out not to be a sign of hope, but the spitting image of the parents.

Emma Cooper (2022)

In Celebration of Marilyn Monroe’s birthday, born on this day in 1926, I present to you The Mystery of Marilyn Monroe: The Unheard Tapes. Hollywood icon Marilyn Monroe’s tragic death spawned conspiracies and rumors for decades, often overshadowing her talent and shrewdness. By piecing together her final weeks, days, and hours through previously unheard recordings of those who knew her best, the film illuminates more of her glamorous, complicated life, and offers a new perspective on that fateful night.

The Mystery of Marilyn Monroe: The Unheard Tapes is a 2022 American documentary film directed by Emma Cooper for Netflix. It is centered around the life and untimely death of American actress and cultural icon Marilyn Monroe and is told through archival footage and unseen interviews with friends of the star. The film was released on April 27, 2022.

Hobo Moon

The Zombie Association of America

Are you tired of living your life like the other brain dead Americans that consume the country? Are you sick of even waking up in the morning to face the day, your monotonous job, and your fellow employees? Do you live your life in fear of the others that surround you? What’s the point of even getting out of your warm, cozy bed to face a cold, uncaring world?  The Zombie Association of America has a solution for you. We will send one of our finest zombies to your home to infect you with their disease within the next twenty-four hours. Do not be afraid. You will be drained of your ambitions, dreams, goals, and any other cares you may have the instant our zombie begins feeding upon your brains. Once our zombie has finished their meal, you will be able to infect others that made life difficult for you. Don’t be the last person on your block to think for themselves. Eat brains today. Call within the next ten minutes and we will send two zombies for the price of one to infect you and your family. Act now. Sorry no COD’s.

Call 1-800-ZOMBIEUSA today!!!

Michael Snow (1956)

Snow made his first film, A to Z, while working at the animation firm Graphic Associates in Toronto. He received a job there after meeting the head of the firm, George Dunning—who later directed the Beatles’ 1968 film Yellow Submarine—at one of Snow’s exhibitions. A to Z is a cutout animation of tables and chairs attempting to mate with each other. The theme of tables and chairs recurs in several other works by Snow from this period. The crosshatch drawings of these objects in A to Z were influenced by the Expressionist style of Swiss-German artist Paul Klee. Snow did not return to experimental film until 1964, when he made New York Eye and Ear Control.

Read more at aci-iac.ca

Winston Hacking (2018)

“I’m looking for interaction between things that originally didn’t have any.”

Winston Hacking

The film was made specifically for a group show in Vienna (curated by Clint Enns and Madi Piller) titled From A to Z, that reflects on Micheal Snow’s 1956 animated film of the same name, and his multiplicity of approaches which fluidly transition between media and form.

The piece is an endless barrage of hyperlinked cable television commercials. With equal doses of satire and nostalgia, the promised pleasures of late consumer capitalism are deconstructed through a contemporary form of détournement. – Clint Enns

2019 – Best Non-Narrative – Ottawa International Animation Festival
2019 – Best Animation Technique – Ottawa International Animation Festival
2019 – Best Canadian Short – Giraf Festival
2019 – Honourable Mention – Stoptrik Animation Festival

Robert Zemeckis (2022)

Here’s The Trailer for Pinocchio!

When you wish upon a star…. Well, I guess you get another live action remake of a beloved Disney classic.  In this case, the remake is Pinocchio.  Now before anyone rolls their eyes at another Disney remake, it should perhaps be considered that this one is being directed by Robert Zemeckis and it stars Tom […]

Here’s The Trailer for Pinocchio! — Through the Shattered Lens

RUFFMERCY & The Chemical Brothers (2021)

“The Darkness That You Fear is a hopeful piece of music. When we found the combination of the different voices worked set to the flow of the music it made us feel optimistic, like it was something we wanted to share.”

Tom Rowlands of The Chemical Brothers

The video is directed by @Ruffmercy “When I first heard the song I immediately connected with the theme and the overall positive vibe. New government rules for relaxing lockdown had been announced and combined with the sun shining, it left me feeling positive about the forthcoming summer. It also triggered a strong sense of nostalgia that led to me going back to look for visual inspiration from the period in time when I first discovered The Chemical Brothers in the mid ’90’s. The video combines archive rave footage from the mid to late 90’s with hand painted Super 8 film textures and hand drawn animation. I love using colour to create chaos and evoke emotions and this was the perfect project to do that.”

Director: RUFFMERCY @ruffmercy
Production Company: @myaccompliceldn
Executive Producer: Jamie Clark
Producer: Richard Grewe @richardgrewe
Editor: Charlie Reddie @ Stitch @stitchediting
Picture Researcher: Susi Paz
Commissioner: Ailsa Robertson
Directors Rep: Alexa Haywood @freeagentuk
Additional Animation: Patch D. Keyes @patch_d_keyes
Shouts outs to Little Kev and @kinolibrary

Vocal samples: Caroline Ellis on The Bugaloos’ “The Senses Of Our World” (1970) & John Ellison on “I’ll Be Loving You” by Soul Brothers Six (1967)

Studio Brussel (1991)

In 1994, grunge icon Kurt Cobain died. A few years before his death, Studio Brussel got the chance to interview Cobain in ‘De Vooruit’, in Ghent on november 23rd, 1991. He was there with his band Nirvana after they just released their second album ‘Nevermind’. For more than 25 years the interview got lost in the huge archives of the Belgian public television and radio. Until now!

Animations by Bart Lodts.

Wilfred Jackson & Walt Disney (1935)

The Band Concert is an animated short film produced in 3-strip Technicolor by Walt Disney Productions and released by United Artists. It was the 73rd Mickey Mouse short film to be released, and the second of that year. The Band Concert was the first Mickey Mouse film produced in color.

The Band Concert was directed by Wilfred Jackson and featured adapted music by Leigh Harline. The only speaking character in the film is Donald Duck who is performed by voice actor Clarence Nash. The film remains one of the most highly acclaimed of the Disney shorts. The story is about a small music band conducted by Mickey Mouse which struggles through a distraction-filled public performance.

Although The Band Concert did not receive any Academy Award nominations, it has nonetheless become one of the most highly acclaimed Disney short films.

“None of the dozens of works produced in America at the same time in all the other arts can stand comparison with this one.”

Gilbert Seldes, Esquire Magazine

The Italian conductor Arturo Toscanini was such a fan of The Band Concert that he saw it six times in the theater and later invited Walt Disney to his home in Italy.

“one of the best cartoons ever made anywhere… There are nuances of expression in Mickey’s character throughout this film that had seldom been explored in earlier shorts. The pacing is also entirely different from the standard Mickey Mouse comedies of the early thirties. Instead of trying to pack in a thousand gags a minute, The Band Concert takes its time and builds to a crescendo.”

Leonard Maltin, Film Critic