Arthur Davis & Sid Marcus (1937)

The Little Match Girl is a 1937 animated short film produced by Charles Mintz.

The Little Match Girl is a literary fairy tale by Danish poet and author Hans Christian Andersen. It was originally published in 1845. This version, produced by Charles Mintz Productions, is set in 1937 modern day in a city that appears to be New York. It is New Year’s Eve, and revelers are out at midnight celebrating the New Year. None of the people drinking and partying notice a little girl, clad in nothing but a ragged shirt, barefoot in the winter cold. The little girl tries to sell her matches, but no one buys any. The little girl is homeless, so when she fails to sell her matches she retreats to her regular spot in an alley. Lighting the matches one at a time for warmth, she imagines all the things she doesn’t have, like a warm hearth, food, and a comfy bed. Eventually she has a dream of heaven.

Hans Christian Andersen (1845)

Most terribly cold it was; it snowed, and was nearly quite dark, and evening– the last evening of the year. In this cold and darkness there went along the street a poor little girl, bareheaded, and with naked feet. When she left home she had slippers on, it is true; but what was the good of that? They were very large slippers, which her mother had hitherto worn; so large were they; and the poor little thing lost them as she scuffled away across the street, because of two carriages that rolled by dreadfully fast.

One slipper was nowhere to be found; the other had been laid hold of by an urchin, and off he ran with it; he thought it would do capitally for a cradle when he some day or other should have children himself. So the little maiden walked on with her tiny naked feet, that were quite red and blue from cold. She carried a quantity of matches in an old apron, and she held a bundle of them in her hand. Nobody had bought anything of her the whole livelong day; no one had given her a single farthing.

She crept along trembling with cold and hunger–a very picture of sorrow, the poor little thing!

The flakes of snow covered her long fair hair, which fell in beautiful curls around her neck; but of that, of course, she never once now thought. From all the windows the candles were gleaming, and it smelt so deliciously of roast goose, for you know it was New Year’s Eve; yes, of that she thought.

In a corner formed by two houses, of which one advanced more than the other, she seated herself down and cowered together. Her little feet she had drawn close up to her, but she grew colder and colder, and to go home she did not venture, for she had not sold any matches and could not bring a farthing of money: from her father she would certainly get blows, and at home it was cold too, for above her she had only the roof, through which the wind whistled, even though the largest cracks were stopped up with straw and rags.

Her little hands were almost numbed with cold. Oh! a match might afford her a world of comfort, if she only dared take a single one out of the bundle, draw it against the wall, and warm her fingers by it. She drew one out. “Rischt!” how it blazed, how it burnt! It was a warm, bright flame, like a candle, as she held her hands over it: it was a wonderful light. It seemed really to the little maiden as though she were sitting before a large iron stove, with burnished brass feet and a brass ornament at top. The fire burned with such blessed influence; it warmed so delightfully. The little girl had already stretched out her feet to warm them too; but–the small flame went out, the stove vanished: she had only the remains of the burnt-out match in her hand.

She rubbed another against the wall: it burned brightly, and where the light fell on the wall, there the wall became transparent like a veil, so that she could see into the room. On the table was spread a snow-white tablecloth; upon it was a splendid porcelain service, and the roast goose was steaming famously with its stuffing of apple and dried plums. And what was still more capital to behold was, the goose hopped down from the dish, reeled about on the floor with knife and fork in its breast, till it came up to the poor little girl; when–the match went out and nothing but the thick, cold, damp wall was left behind. She lighted another match. Now there she was sitting under the most magnificent Christmas tree: it was still larger, and more decorated than the one which she had seen through the glass door in the rich merchant’s house.

Thousands of lights were burning on the green branches, and gaily-colored pictures, such as she had seen in the shop-windows, looked down upon her. The little maiden stretched out her hands towards them when–the match went out. The lights of the Christmas tree rose higher and higher, she saw them now as stars in heaven; one fell down and formed a long trail of fire.

“Someone is just dead!” said the little girl; for her old grandmother, the only person who had loved her, and who was now no more, had told her, that when a star falls, a soul ascends to God.

She drew another match against the wall: it was again light, and in the lustre there stood the old grandmother, so bright and radiant, so mild, and with such an expression of love.

“Grandmother!” cried the little one. “Oh, take me with you! You go away when the match burns out; you vanish like the warm stove, like the delicious roast goose, and like the magnificent Christmas tree!” And she rubbed the whole bundle of matches quickly against the wall, for she wanted to be quite sure of keeping her grandmother near her. And the matches gave such a brilliant light that it was brighter than at noon-day: never formerly had the grandmother been so beautiful and so tall. She took the little maiden, on her arm, and both flew in brightness and in joy so high, so very high, and then above was neither cold, nor hunger, nor anxiety–they were with God.

But in the corner, at the cold hour of dawn, sat the poor girl, with rosy cheeks and with a smiling mouth, leaning against the wall–frozen to death on the last evening of the old year. Stiff and stark sat the child there with her matches, of which one bundle had been burnt. “She wanted to warm herself,” people said. No one had the slightest suspicion of what beautiful things she had seen; no one even dreamed of the splendor in which, with her grandmother she had entered on the joys of a new year.

Mike Judge (2020)

Beavis and Butthead answer questions about their upcoming new episodes on Comedy Central.

Characters Created & Voiced (Archive) by Mike Judge
Directed, Written & Animated by Steven Anderson
Produced & Additional Voice by Ruhi Bhalla

Comedy Central on Wednesday announced “Beavis and Butt-Head” creator Mike Judge will reimagine the Gen X MTV series in two new seasons. Judge also will create additional spinoffs and specials of the animated series.

“Beavis and Butt-Head,” which first aired in 1993, quickly became a pop culture hit. It centered around two oddball teenage couch potatoes whose commentary is anything but wise.

Judge is set to write, produce and provide voice-over for both characters for Comedy Central.

“We are thrilled to be working with Mike Judge and the great team at 3 Arts again as we double down on Adult Animation at Comedy Central” Chris McCarthy, president of Entertainment & Youth Group, said in a statement. “Beavis and Butt-Head were a defining voice of a generation, and we can’t wait to watch as they navigate the treacherous waters of a world light-years from their own.”

“It seemed like the time was right to get stupid again,” Judge said in a statement.

By Marianne Garvey

Fleischer Studios (1933)

An action figure of Betty Boop drops in on a small toy shop. The other toys come to life and crown her their queen. But there’s a big rag doll of King Kong. Based on the titular classical music Written by Rod Crawford.

Animated by Seymour Kneitel & William Henning.

A large factory complex struggles to produce a single package, which is rushed to a toy store. The box opens, and out steps a Betty Boop doll. The other toys come to life, parade around to the music of Parade of the Wooden Soldiers and crown her their queen. But a large stuffed toy of King Kong begins breaking things up by kidnapping Betty. Eventually, the big ape is defeated, and the somewhat damaged toys resume their parade, and afterwards fall still on a counter in a store selling damaged toys.

The instrumental title theme, Parade of the Wooden Soldiers (also known as Parade of the Tin Soldiers), was composed by Leon Jessel.

Frank Tashlin (1942)

This cartoon features a running-gag and a John Barrymore caricature who is mobbed by fans for his autograph during a burlesqued tour of Hollywood. The narrator conducts a tour of Hollywood Boulevard, Malibu Beach, Santa Anita Race Track, the Brown Derby, and Grauman’s Chinese theatre.

“Weird Al” Yankovic (2016)

Straight Outta Lynwood is the twelfth studio album by “Weird Al” Yankovic, released on September 26, 2006. It was the sixth studio album self-produced by Yankovic. The musical styles on the album are built around parodies and pastiches of pop and rock music of the mid-2000s. The album’s lead single, White & Nerdy, is a parody of Chamillionaire’s hit single Ridin’. The single peaked at number nine on the Billboard Hot 100; Canadian Idiot, a parody of Green Day’s American Idiot, also charted, peaking at number 82. The album contains three further parodies, based on Confessions Part II by Usher, Do I Make You Proud by Taylor Hicks, and Trapped in the Closet by R. Kelly. The other half of the album is original material, containing many “style parodies”—musical imitations of existing artists, such as Brian Wilson, Rage Against the Machine, Sparks, animated musical specials, Cake, and 1980s charity songs.

Gorillaz (2018)

Tranz debuted—alongside three others—on June 1st, 2018, at the Rock im Park festival in Nürnberg. It is the second-listed track on Gorillaz’s sixth studio album, The Now Now, which has since released on June 29, 2018.
A music video was released on September 13th, 2018.

Director: Jamie Hewlett

Co-director: Nicos Livesey

Executive Producer: Bart Yates

Producer: Georgina Fillmore

Gorillaz are managed by Eleven Management.

Production Company: Blinkink

Production Company: Eddy

Executive Producers Eddy: Emilie Walmsley, Lars Wagner

Production Coordinator: Maria Kolandawel

Production Manager Eddy: Stella Ramsden

Line Producer: Fabien Cellier

Production Assistants: Lina Houari, Agathe Derosier

Director of Photography: Max Halstead

1st Camera Assistant: Toby Goodyear

Editor: Paul Moth

Animation by: Brunch

Lead Animator: Romain Barriaux

Storyboard and Layout: Julien Perron

Animation: Romain Barriaux, Julien Perron, Leo Schweitzer, Martin Richard, Paul Nivet, Magali Garnier, Léonard Bismuth, Simon Duong van Huyen, Mathilde Loubes, Victor Chagniot (work experience)

Animation Clean-up: Mathilde Loubes, Antoine Carré

Colour and Shadow animation: Meton Joffily d’Alençar, Rohit Kelkar, Antoine Carré, Constance Bertoux

Compositing: Vincent Ewald

Compositing assistant: Ekin Koca

3D Animators: Erik Ferguson, Oliver Latta, Marco Mori

Analog Synth: Michael Knight

Animation Clips: Lee Hardcastle, Macomoroni, Extraweg, Fergemanden

Animatic: Simone Ghilardotti

Sound FX: Offset Audio

Narmak (2017)

The SpongeBob SquarePants Anime is a web animation by Narmak depicting the cast of SpongeBob SquarePants in a stereotypical anime style as an affectionate parody of both the cartoon and basic anime tropes.

The age-old question has never been answered: what if SpongeBob was made by weeaboo trash? I was brought onto this Earth to answer such a question, and that answer is this video. Enjoy!

Narmak

Bugs Bunny’s milestone 80th birthday year coincides with the debut of Looney Tunes Cartoons, the critically acclaimed HBO Max Original series produced by Warner Bros. Animation. Warner Bros. is throwing a celebration like no other.

A Wild Hare

Tex Avery (1940)

A Wild Hare is a 1940 Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies cartoon supervised by Tex Avery. The short subject features Elmer Fudd and Bugs Bunny. The short is Bugs Bunny’s first official appearance.

Bugs’s nonchalant stance, as explained many years later by Chuck Jones, and again by Friz Freleng and Bob Clampett, comes from the 1934 movie It Happened One Night, from a scene where Clark Gable’s character is leaning against a fence eating carrots more quickly than he is swallowing (as Bugs would later do), giving instructions with his mouth full to Claudette Colbert’s character. This scene was so famous at the time that most people immediately saw the connection.

The line, “What’s up, Doc?”, was added by director Tex Avery for this film. Avery explained later that it was a common expression in Texas where he was from, and he didn’t think much of the phrase. But when this short was screened in theaters, the scene of Bugs calmly chewing a carrot, followed by the nonchalant “What’s Up, Doc?”, went against any 1940s audience’s expectation of how a rabbit might react to a hunter and caused complete pandemonium in the audience, bringing down the house in every theater. As a result of this popularity, Bugs eats a carrot and utters some version of the phrase in almost every one of his cartoons; sometimes entirely out of context.

Porky’s Hare Hunt

Ben “Bugs” Hardaway & Cal Dalton (1938)

This cartoon marked the first appearance of the rabbit that would evolve into Bugs Bunny, who is barely recognizable compared to his more familiar later form. Bugs’ first official appearance would come two years later in A Wild Hare.

While Porky’s Hare Hunt was the first Warner Bros. cartoon to feature a Bugs Bunny-like rabbit, A Wild Hare, directed by Tex Avery and released on July 27, 1940, is widely considered to be the first official Bugs Bunny cartoon.

The first “true” appearance of Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd. Elmer is a dimwitted hunter, “wooking for wabbits.” Bugs is a clever, smooth-talking character, who confuses Elmer with double-talk and misdirection. Elmer is no match for the wascally wabbit, even when he thinks Bugs is dead.

Bugs Bunny’s 80th Anniversary Extravaganza

Comic Con (2020)

Take a trip through eight decades of laughs and carrots when Warner Bros. Home Entertainment (WBHE) presents an all-encompassing look at one of the world’s most beloved and recognizable stars. Join three of the current voices of Bugs Bunny–Billy West (Space Jam, Futurama, Doug), Jeff Bergman (Tiny Toon Adventures, Our Cartoon President), and Eric Bauza (Looney Tunes Cartoons, Muppet Babies)–alongside Looney Tunes Cartoons executive producer Pete Browngardt (Uncle Grandpa), movie historian, author and TV personality Leonard Maltin (Entertainment Tonight), animation historian and author Jerry Beck (Animation Scoop), and Warner Archive senior vice president George Feltenstein as they cover the gamut of Bugs’ history from theatrical shorts to Saturday morning cartoons and the new HBO-MAX series. Actress Yvette Nicole Brown (Community, Avengers: Endgame, DC Super Hero Girls) will moderate the panel.

To see more Bugs Bunny cartoons click here: https://play.hbomax.com/page/urn:hbo:page:looney-tunes?utm_id=sa%7c71700000067032079%7c58700005866967669%7cp53640660949&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI5OX60syo6gIVNh6tBh2I4w08EAAYASAAEgJ-9_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

Happy Birthday, Bugs. Thanks for the years of laughter.

Pearl Jam (2020)

Superblood Wolfmoon is a song by American alternative rock band Pearl Jam. The song was released on February 18, 2020, as the second single from their eleventh studio album, Gigaton (2020).

Created by: Tiny Concert

Director: Keith Ross

Video Producer: Scott Greer

Post Production: PB&I

Post Producers: Todd Broder, Ryan Duff, Amit Macker

Editor: Gino Gianoli

Studio artist: Joan Heo

Artist Consultant: Talia Handler

Superblood Wolfmoon
Took her away too soon
Superblood Wolfmoon

Took her away too soon

I can hear you singin’ in the distance
I can see you when I close my eyes
Once, you were somewhere and now you’re everywhere
I’m feeling selfish and I want what’s right
I ask for forgiveness
I beg of myself
Feeling every night that I see

Right now I feel a lack of innocence
Searchin’ for reveal hypnotonic residence
I feel not much of anything
And the cause is life or death
A life of hopelessness, focus on you focusness
I’ve been hopin’ and I hope that lasts
I don’t know anything, I question everything
This life I love is going way too fast

Both my eyes are swollen, my face is broken
And I’m hope that I hurt you
Hope that I hurt you
Hope that I hurt you

She was a stunner and I am stunned
And the first thought or second thought “could be the one”
I was a prisoner of keys and the cuffs
Yeah, I was feeling fortunate to be locked up

But the world got to spinnin’
Always felt like it was endin’
And love right, it was standin’
We are each of us

I can hear you singin’ in the distance
I can see you when I close my eyes
Once, you were somewhere and now you’re everywhere
I’m feeling selfish and I want what’s right

I ask for forgiveness
I beg of myself
Feelin’ angry
Now, get off the stage

Superblood Wolfmoon
Took her away too soon
Superblood Wolfmoon
Took her away too soon
Superblood Wolfmoon
Took her away too soon

I can hear you singin’ in the distance
I can see you when I close my eyes
Once, you were somewhere and now you’re everywhere
I’m feeling selfish and I want what’s right
Focus on you focusness, turn around for hopelessness
I’ve been hopin’ and all hope was lost
I don’t know anything, I question everything
This life I love is going way too fast

Nick Anderson (2020)

The Pulitzer-winning cartoonist Nick Anderson has described Donald Trump as an “adolescent wannabe authoritarian”, after the US president’s re-election campaign failed to pull one of Anderson’s cartoons mocking Trump’s inaccurate suggestion that injecting disinfectant could protect against Covid-19.

Anderson put his cartoon The Trump Cult up for sale. The illustration shows Trump with supporters in Maga hats, serving them a drink that has been labeled “Kool-Aid”, then “Chloroquine” and finally “Clorox”, a US bleach brand. The cartoon is a reference to the 1978 Jonestown massacre, where more than 900 people died after drinking cyanide-laced punch at the order of cult leader Jim Jones, and to Trump’s widely denounced idea of injecting bleach to protect against coronavirus. Trump has also been taking the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a protection against Covid-19, despite a study showing it has been linked to increased deaths in patients.

But Anderson’s illustration was pulled from sale following a trademark infringement claim made by Trump’s campaign organisation, Donald J Trump for President Inc. Writing on the Daily Kos, Anderson said that he believed the claim was made due to his depiction of Maga hats, and described the situation as “absurd”.

“We live in a strange time when the POTUS can falsely accuse someone of murder with impunity, while at the same time bully a private business into removing content it doesn’t like,” Anderson added.

The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF) and other free speech organisations subsequently got involved, sending a group letter that accused Trump’s campaign of having “misused reporting mechanisms to suppress protected political expression in the form of parody, critique, and satire”, and arguing that the work and those who publish it are protected by the first amendment.

Anderson’s cartoon was reinstated on social media, saying that it strives “to respect IP rights and freedom of speech, but we sometimes make mistakes, as we did here … We’re sorry for any inconvenience this has caused.”

In a statement, Anderson praised social media for recognizing the error, but said there were some “troubling issues” raised by the affair, including that the cartoon was removed less than 24 hours after he posted it, before he had received a single order.

“I doubt anyone had even seen it yet on the site,” he said. “This reveals that the Trump campaign has a system in place, trawling for material they find objectionable. If it happened to me so quickly, it likely has happened to others. How much other content has been removed this way on sites?”

He added: “It must be pointed out: the president of the United States is a hypocrite who complains about the ‘violation’ of his free speech, then tries to actively suppress the free speech of others. These are actions of an adolescent wannabe-authoritarian.”

Trump criticized social media for “completely stifling FREE SPEECH”, after the social media platform put a warning label on two of his posts spreading lies about mail-in voting.

CBLDF executive director Charles Brownstein said the organisation was “sensitive to the issues companies face in balancing competing rights owner issues, and were alarmed to see the president’s re-election campaign exploiting those issues to suppress protected speech”.

“We’re pleased that social media has done the right thing in this case,” he said. “We hope that they will continue to assert the First Amendment rights they and their sellers are guaranteed by rejecting any similar censorship attempts.”

Lalo Alcaraz (2020)

Lalo Alcaraz boycotts Goya Foods and the trump administration with his satirical political cartoons.

Visit Lalo Alcaraz at https://laloalcaraz.com/

Lalo Alcaraz is an award-winning visual/media artist and television/film writer. A Los Angeles resident, he has been chronicling the ascendancy of Latinos in the U.S. for over a quarter-century.

The busy Chicano artist is the creator of the syndicated daily comic strip La Cucaracha seen in the L.A. Times and other newspapers nationwide.

Alcaraz is founder and Jefe-in-Chief of POCHO, which started out as a Xeroxed zine in the last century and now ranks a leading Latino satire website.

A prolific political cartoonist, Lalo is the winner of six Los Angeles Press Club awards for Best Editorial Cartoon.

He was an editorial cartoonist for the L.A. Weekly from 1992-2010 and now creates editorial cartoons in English and Spanish for Andrews McMeel Syndication, Daily Kos, and various newspapers, including Philadelphia’s Al Dia News.

His work has appeared on 60 Minutes, CBS News, NBC, Univision, and in hundreds of publications.

Lalo’s graphic novel and cartoon books include the New York Times bestseller A Most Imperfect Union, Latino USA: A Cartoon History, 15th Anniversary Edition; Migra Mouse: Political Cartoons On Immigration; and La Cucaracha.

Author of the forthcoming graphic history novel, UNIDOS, about the historic civil rights group formerly known as the National Council of La Raza (now UnidosUS), Lalo is also a highly sought-after Hollywood consultant and producer.

In 2014 he was a staff writer and producer on the animated Seth MacFarlane-led TV show Bordertown on Fox.

He next served as cultural consultant on the Oscar-winning Day of the Dead-themed Pixar movie COCO.

Alcaraz was recently cultural consultant, consulting producer, and writer on the animated series The Loud House and now on Nick’s The Casagrandes.

Alcaraz is the co-host of KPFK satirical talk show, The Pocho Hour of Power, heard on L.A.’s  Pacifica station KPFK 90.7 FM.

He is a former illustration faculty member at Otis College of Fine Art & Design in Los Angeles.

He is a graduate of San Diego State University (BA in Art) and UC Berkeley (Master of Architecture).

Lalo was born in San Diego, California to Mexican immigrant parents from Sinaloa and Zacatecas.

He is married to a public school teacher and they have three somewhat obedient children.

Gary Larson (2020)

The Far Side creator Gary Larson is back to his drawing board with New Stuff! Click on the links below to explore his new works.

https://www.thefarside.com/new-stuff/115/taxidermist

https://www.thefarside.com/new-stuff/118/probe-release

https://www.thefarside.com/new-stuff/121/cub-scouts

“I don’t want to mislead anyone here. This corner of the website—New Stuff—is not a resurrection of The Far Side daily cartoons. (Well, not exactly, anyway—like the proverbial tiger and its stripes, I’m pretty much stuck with my sense of humor. Aren’t we all?) The thing is, I thoroughly enjoyed my career as a syndicated cartoonist, and I hope, in spirit at least, we had some laughs together. But after fifteen years of meeting deadlines, well, blah blah blah … you know the rest. The day after I retired from syndication, it felt good not to draw on a deadline. And after moving on to other interests, drawing just wasn’t on my to-do list. Things change. But then a few years ago—and returning to the subject at hand—­something happened in my life, and it started with a clogged pen.

“Despite my retirement, I still had intermittent connections to cartooning, including my wife’s and my personal Christmas card. Once a year, I’d sit myself down to take on Santa, and every year it began with the same ritual: me cursing at, and then cleaning out, my clogged pen. (Apparently, the concept of cleaning it before putting it away each year was just too elusive for me.) As problems go, this is admittedly not exactly on the scale of global warming, but in the small world of my studio, it was cataclysmic. Okay, highly annoying.

“So a few years ago—finally fed up with my once-loyal but now reliably traitorous pen—I decided to try a digital tablet. I knew nothing about these devices but hoped it would just get me through my annual Christmas card ordeal. I got one, fired it up, and lo and behold, something totally unexpected happened: within moments, I was having fun drawing again. I was stunned at all the tools the thing offered, all the creative potential it contained. I simply had no idea how far these things had evolved. Perhaps fittingly, the first thing I drew was a caveman.

“The New Stuff that you’ll see here is the result of my journey into the world of digital art. Believe me, this has been a bit of a learning curve for me. I hail from a world of pen and ink, and suddenly I was feeling like I was sitting at the controls of a 747. (True, I don’t get out much.) But as overwhelmed as I was, there was still something familiar there—a sense of adventure. That had always been at the core of what I enjoyed most when I was drawing The Far Side, that sense of exploring, reaching for something, taking some risks, sometimes hitting a home run and sometimes coming up with ‘Cow tools.’ (Let’s not get into that.) But as a jazz teacher once said to me about improvisation, ‘You want to try and take people somewhere where they might not have been before.’ I think that my approach to cartooning was similar—I’m just not sure if even I knew where I was going. But I was having fun.

“So here goes. I’ve got my coffee, I’ve got this cool gizmo, and I’ve got no deadlines. And—to borrow from Sherlock Holmes—the game is afoot.

“Again, please remember, I’m just exploring, experimenting, and trying stuff. New Stuff. I have just one last thing to say before I go: thank you, clogged pen.”

Gary Larson

Run the Jewels feat. Lil Bub, Maceo, Delonte

Directed and animated by Cyriac (2016)

Official music video for “Meowpurrdy” from the Meow The Jewels album by Run The Jewels. Featuring Lil Bub, Maceo, and Delonte.

Animated by British artist Cyriak, the clip features a beastly, three-eyed cat, around which a kaleidoscopic collection of smaller cats gather, multiply and morph extra eyes, legs, tails and heads. This frightening feline, however, is no match for an angelic gray tabby, who descends from the sky and destroys the beast by being swallowed and coughed back up like an explosive hairball.

Killer Mike and El-P have donated all earnings from Meow the Jewels directly to the families of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, two high-profile victims of police brutality. Additional profits have gone to the National Lawyers Guild’s Mass Defense Committee.

Directed by Juan Meza-León

From the album Run The Jewels 3.

Rick and Morty is Adult Swim’s most scientifically accurate animated comedy. Created by Justin Roiland and Dan Harmon, it catalogues the bizarre misadventures of a bored scientific genius/drunkard and his socially awkward grandson, Morty. Their exploits tend to have unintended consequences for Morty’s dysfunctional family, especially his unfailingly mediocre father, Jerry. Watch Rick and Morty battle everything from interdimensional customs agents to Cronenberg monsters.

Cyriak & Sparks (2020)

The official video for The Existential Threat by rock and pop band Sparks, taken from the album A Steady Drip, Drip, Drip. Listen: https://sparks.lnk.to/dripCY. Animated and directed by Cyriak.

Danger near, danger here! Animator Cyriak is known for his outlandish and trippy visual collages, and they serve as the perfect visual complement to this offbeat track about the end of the world by the enigmatic art rock band Sparks. From the album A Steady Drip Drip Drip.

“When I was asked to make a music video for Sparks I could hardly believe it. They sent me the whole of their new album to choose from, and there was this one song that immediately stood out The Existential Threat.

“Not only did the music fit perfectly with my animation style, but the subject of existential dread is also something I have been fascinated by for as long as I can remember. It was like I could see the whole video inside my head as I listened to the song.

“The brief was totally open, but I felt this track deserved more than just some crazy visuals. It has a psychology driving it, and a feeling that hangs over us all, especially in these modern times of information overload.

“Are these threats real, or imaginary? Are they just a paranoid delusion, or do we ignore them at our peril?

“It was great fun making this video, and I hope it makes people think about their inevitable impending death in a more light-hearted way.”

Cyriak