Walt Disney (1933)

The Mad Doctor is a classic Mickey Mouse cartoon released in 1933. It is known as the first appearance of the title character “The Mad Doctor”, or “Dr. XXX”.

The short’s horror overtones made it unusual for a Mickey Mouse cartoon. Some theaters refused to show it, believing it to be too scary for kids. At one time, for this reason, it was banned entirely in the United Kingdom, as well as Nazi Germany.

The short’s title character had a cameo in the Roger Rabbit short Tummy Trouble, in which he was seen on a picture. You can view Tummy Trouble by following this link: https://hobomooncartoons.com/2019/04/08/roger-rabbit-in-tummy-trouble/

This cartoon is one of a few Disney shorts that lapsed into the public domain.

Gary K. Wolf (1981)


I recently had this wonderful Roger Rabbit trilogy signed by the original creator of Roger Rabbit himself, Gary K. Wolf. He is one of the kindest and most down-to-Earth artists I have ever had the pleasure of talking to.

You can find out more about Gary and his works by visiting his website at
https://garywolf.com/ and by visiting his Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1498857407.

For Gary K. Wolf, a simple philosophy of believing in an idea and seeing it through – whether it be a blue cow or a madcap rabbit – paid off. “I color cows blue,” he says, “and make people happy! That’s my fondest childhood dream come true.”

Gary K. Wolf is an American author. He is best known as the author of Who Censored Roger Rabbit?, which was adapted into the hit feature-length film Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Joel Silver (2003)

The success of Who Framed Roger Rabbit? rekindled an interest in the Golden Age of American animation, and sparked the modern animation scene. In 1991, Walt Disney Imagineering began to develop Mickey’s Toontown for Disneyland, based on the Toontown that appeared in the film. The attraction also features a ride called Roger Rabbit’s Car Toon Spin. Three theatrical animated shorts were also produced: Tummy Trouble, played in front of Honey, I Shrunk the Kids; Roller Coaster Rabbit was shown with Dick Tracy; and Trail Mix-Up was included with A Far Off Place.The film also inspired a short-lived comic-book and video-game spin-offs, including two PC games, the Japanese version of The Bugs Bunny Crazy Castle (which features Roger instead of Bugs), a 1989 game released on the Nintendo Entertainment System, and a 1991 game released on the Game Boy.

In December 2016, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

The film is based on Gary K. Wolf’s 1981 novel Who Censored Roger Rabbit?

Raoul J. Raoul (1988)

Somethin’s Cookin is a 1988 animation film in Who Framed Roger Rabbit that opens the movie. In it, Roger is given the task of babysitting Baby Herman or risk being “sent back to the science lab”. From his crib, Baby Herman spots a cookie jar on top of the refrigerator and promptly escapes his crib into the kitchen. Roger tries to stop him as he wanders into danger.