Robert Smigel & J. J. Sedelmaier (2011)

Happy Pride Month!

Ace and Gary team up to fight crime in their usual, awkward fashion.

Bighead and his henchmen blast Ace and Gary with a flesh ray, transforming them from animated characters to live-action ones, in which they are portrayed by Jon Hamm and Jimmy Fallon, respectively. The gun malfunctions and “unanimates” everyone, with Ed Helms playing Half-Scary, Fred Armisen as Lizardo, Stephen Colbert as Dr. Brainio, and Steve Carell as Bighead.

The Ambiguously Gay Duo is an American animated comedy sketch that debuted on The Dana Carvey Show before moving to its permanent home on Saturday Night Live.

The Ambiguously Gay Duo follows the adventures of Ace and Gary, voiced by Stephen Colbert and Steve Carell, two superheroes whose sexual orientation is a matter of dispute, and a cavalcade of characters preoccupied with the question.

The Ambiguously Gay Duo is a parody of the stereotypical comic book superhero duo done in the style of Saturday morning cartoons like Super Friends. The characters are clad in matching pastel turquoise tights, dark blue domino masks, and bright yellow coordinated gauntlets, boots and shorts. The shorts were intended to satirize suggestions that early Batman comics implied a homosexual relationship between the eponymous title character and his field partner and protégé Robin, a charge most infamously leveled by Fredric Wertham in his 1954 book, Seduction of the Innocent, the research methodology for which was later discredited.

The typical episode usually begins with the duo’s arch-nemesis Bighead, a criminal mastermind with an abnormally large cranium. Bighead is usually briefing his henchmen on a plot for some grandiose plan for world domination, interrupted by a debate as to whether or not Ace and Gary are gay. Once the crime is in process, the police commissioner calls on the superheroes to save the day, often engaging in similar debates with the chief of police.

Ace and Gary set out to foil the evil plan, but not before calling attention to themselves with outrageous antics and innuendo, and behaving in ways perceived by other characters to be stereotypically homosexual.

Featuring Big Gay Al’s musical number

I’m Super!

Trey Parker & Matt Stone (1999)

Happy Pride Month!

Big Gay Al is a stereotypical homosexual man who first appeared in the Season One episode, Big Gay Al’s Big Gay Boat Ride. He is known for his flamboyant and positive demeanor and usually responds to the greeting “How are you?” with an upbeat “I’m super! Thanks for asking!”

At the USO show before the troops entered the American-Canadian War, Big Gay Al started the song I’m Super at the request of Stan Marsh and Kyle Broflovski, who needed a distraction so The Mole could free Terrance and Phillip.

Bigger, Longer & Uncut is a 1999 American adult animated musical comedy film based on the animated sitcom South Park. Directed by series creator Trey Parker, the film stars the regular television cast of Parker, series co-creator Matt Stone, Mary Kay Bergman, and Isaac Hayes, with George Clooney, Eric Idle, and Mike Judge in supporting roles. The screenplay, written by Parker, Stone, and Pam Brady, follows Stan Marsh and his friends Kyle Broflovski, Eric Cartman and Kenny McCormick as they sneak into an R-rated film starring their idols, Canadian comedy duo Terrance and Phillip, and begin swearing incessantly. Eventually, their mothers pressure the United States to wage war against Canada for allegedly corrupting their children, giving Stan, Kyle, and Cartman no choice but to unite the other children, fight their own parents, and rescue Terrance and Phillip, while Kenny tries to stop a prophecy involving Satan and Saddam Hussein’s plot to conquer the world.

South Park is an American animated sitcom created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone and developed by Brian Graden for Comedy Central. The series revolves around four boys — Stan Marsh, Kyle Broflovski, Eric Cartman, and Kenny McCormick — and their exploits in and around the titular Colorado town.