Seymour Kneitel (1956)

Popeye and Bluto are running for president; it’s election day, the vote is tied, and Olive is the only remaining voter.

Olive Oyl won’t vote until her chores are done, so Popeye and Bluto compete to cut her wood, plow her fields, and store her hay. And then it’s just an old-fashioned fight.

Popeye for President is Popeye’s 219th theatrical cartoon, which was released by Famous Studios on March 30, 1956.

Animation by Tom Johnson and Frank Endres.

Story written by Jack Mercer.

Starring Jackson Beck as Bluto, Jack Mercer as Popeye, and Mae Questel as Olive Oyl.

Max Fleischer (1942)

This obscure Fleischer two-reel cartoon is one of the oddest Fleischer shorts ever made. It starts out as a straight-forward adaptation of Edgar Allen Poe’s classic poem The Raven, but quickly turns into a farce about a door-to-door vacuum salesman (the Raven) and a Wolf. Together, they pay a visit to a very thrifty Scottie Dog, where the Raven attempts to make a sale, while the Wolf goes about breaking into the dog’s safe.

The Raven is voice by Jack Mercer, the famous voice of Popeye the Sailor.

This was the last produced animated short of Fleischer Studios before the Paramount take down replaced them with Famous Studios.