Ralph Bakshi (1988)

Christmas in Tattertown is a 1988 animated television Christmas special created and directed by Ralph Bakshi.
The special was an unsold pilot episode for a series, Tattertown, about a place where everything discarded in the world came alive. Christmas in Tattertown aired on the cable television network Nickelodeon.

Ralph Bakshi originated the idea for Tattertown in high school, where it was originally a comic strip called Junk Town. The strip made light of the human condition by showing the value of things we throw away.

Bakshi worked with Nickelodeon to bring his strip to life as a regular television series, which would have served as Nickelodeon’s first original animated series. In 1988, they commissioned him to create a pilot, which aired on December 21, 1988 during the network’s Nick at Nite block of programming.

Learn more about Ralph Bakshi at https://www.ralphbakshi.com/

Bill Melendez & Charles M. Schulz (1972)

Snoopy Come Home is a 1972 American animated musical comedy-drama film directed by Bill Melendez and written by Charles M. Schulz based on the Peanuts comic strip. The film marks the on-screen debut of Woodstock, who had first appeared in the strip in 1967. It was the only Peanuts film during composer Vince Guaraldi’s lifetime that did not have a score composed by him. Its music was composed by the Sherman Brothers, who composed the music for various Disney films like Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, and Bedknobs and Broomsticks. The film was released on August 9, 1972 by National General Pictures, produced by Lee Mendelson Films and Cinema Center Films.
Despite receiving largely positive reviews, the film was a box-office bomb.

Charles M. Schulz & Bill Melendez (1969)

A Boy Named Charlie Brown is a 1969 American animated musical comedy-drama film, produced by Cinema Center Films, distributed by National General Pictures, and directed by Bill Melendez. It is the first feature film based on the Peanuts comic strip. It is also the final time that Peter Robbins voices the character of Charlie Brown (Robbins had voiced the role for all the Peanuts television specials up to that point, starting with the first recorded special, which also had the title A Boy Named Charlie Brown, in 1963), and it uses most of the same voice cast from the 1969 TV special, It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown, replacing only the actors playing Sally and Schroeder.

The film was well-received and a box-office success, grossing $12 million. Snoopy Come Home came in 1972 as a standalone sequel.

A Boy Named Charlie Brown is an unreleased television documentary film about Charles M. Schulz and his creation Peanuts, produced by Lee Mendelson with some animated scenes by Bill Meléndez and music by Vince Guaraldi.

A Boy Named Charlie Brown was screened the Greater San Francisco Advertising Club, where it was received with considerable enthusiasm, but Mendelson was unsuccessful in securing sponsorship.

Although never aired on television, the documentary was instrumental in garnering commercial support and the creative teamwork that resulted in A Charlie Brown Christmas in 1965 and the ensuing series of Peanuts television specials. Portions of the film were used in commercials for A Charlie Brown Christmas in 1965.

An album by the Vince Guaraldi Trio with music from the above documentary, originally titled Jazz Impressions of A Boy Named Charlie Brown, was released by Fantasy Records in 1964.

Portions of the unaired A Boy Named Charlie Brown were updated and broadcast in 1969 as Charlie Brown and Charles Schulz.

Geoff Dunbar & Paul McCartney (1984)

To mark the 100th birthday of Rupert The Bear, the animated music video for “We All Stand Together” has been remastered and upgraded to HD. The song was the focal point of Rupert and The Frog Song – a short animated film that Paul began work on in 1981 with animator Geoff Dunbar. Written and produced by Paul and directed by Geoff, Rupert and The Frog Song was eventually released in 1984.

Rupert and the Frog Song is a 1984 animated short film based on the comic strip character Rupert Bear, written and produced by Paul McCartney and directed by Geoff Dunbar. The making of Rupert and the Frog Song began in 1981 and ended in 1983. The film was released theatrically as an accompaniment to McCartney’s film Give My Regards to Broad Street. The song We All Stand Together from the film’s soundtrack reached No. 3 when released in the UK Singles Chart. It was released in 2004 as one of the segments of Paul McCartney: Music & Animation. In addition, the film was not produced by Nelvana and Ellipse just like the television series.

The frog chorus on the song We All Stand Together was provided by The King’s Singers and the choir of St Paul’s Cathedral. The flute-playing frog was Elena Durán. The B-side of the single contains a humming version of the song performed by McCartney and the Finchley Frogettes.

Although intended purely as a children’s song in the mould of the Beatles’ Yellow Submarine, the song We All Stand Together is often derided as an example of McCartney’s inconsequential songwriting. In a satirical cartoon by Stephen Collins of The Guardian in 2012, McCartney is shown recalling his creative partnership with John Lennon in the 1960s, before concluding: “It was a great time, y’know… And then I went on to do The Frog Song.”

Rupert Bear is a children’s comic strip character created by British artist Mary Tourtel and first appearing in the Daily Express newspaper on 8 November 1920. Rupert’s initial purpose was to win sales from the rival Daily Mail and Daily Mirror. In 1935, the stories were taken over by Alfred Bestall, who was previously an illustrator for Punch and other glossy magazines. Bestall proved to be successful in the field of children’s literature and worked on Rupert stories and artwork into his 90s. More recently, various other artists and writers have continued the series. About 50 million copies have been sold worldwide.

The comic strip was, and still is, published daily in the Daily Express, with many of these stories later being printed in books, and every year since 1936 a Rupert annual has also been released. Rupert Bear has become a well-known character in children’s culture in the United Kingdom, and the success of the Rupert stories has led to the creation of several television series based on the character. The character also has a large fan following, with such groups as The Followers of Rupert.

Marc Hansen (2017-2019)

*Just a reminder to please vote today!

Here it is, fatheads…

I first found this comic book series as a child rummaging through the magazine rack of a gas station where I used to buy candy and soda down the road from the house I grew up in. Little did I know at the time that I had discovered a great source of inspiration that would help fuel my creativity as I grew into an artist and cartoonist myself.

Marc Hansen is a cartoonist and creator of Ralph Snart Adventures, Weird Melvin, and Doctor Gorpon. Hansen has done most of his work for NOW Comics, but has also done work for Marvel, Disney, Malibu Graphics, and Kitchen Sink Press.

Ralph Snart Adventures was published from 1986-1993 by now defunct NOW Comics, and was the longest running comic in the entire NOW catalog, selling an average of 50,000 copies a month during that nine year period. Over two million comics were published, and it was the first indy comic to receive the Comics Code.

Today, Marc Hansen publishes Ralph Snart Adventures as an ebook on a sporadic basis. Current issues are available on his webstore. Keep up with Ralph Snart on Twitter and Facebook.

The pages above are just excerpts from the Frump Trilogy. If you want to read the trilogy in its entirety or to learn more about Marc Hansen and his creations or to purchase comics online please visit: https://marchansenstuff.com/.

Charles Schulz & Bill Melendez (1966)

Happy Hallowe’en, kiddies! Enjoy this spooky treat. Hahahahahahaha!!!

The Peanuts gang celebrates Halloween while Linus waits for the Great Pumpkin.

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown is a 1966 American prime-time animated television special based on the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. A Halloween special, it was the third Peanuts special to be produced and animated by Bill Melendez.

T.E. Powers & Raoul Barré (1916)

An animated cartoon about a workman who recovers and returns Miss Gotrox’s lost purse containing $10,000,
and receives a Canadian dime as a reward.

Here’s a fun and quirky comic-style animated cartoon by famed animator Raoul Barré of Barré Studios who would later go on to direct animated Mutt & Jeff cartoons in the style of the original comic-strip creator Bud Fisher complete with text balloons much like in the cartoon above.

These short satires of contemporary life are based on Tom Powers’ newspaper comics. The comic-strip structure is barely altered in the two “Phables,” from a seven-film series of 1915-16 animated by the Canadian cartoonist Raoul Barré before he moved on to direct adaptations of the Mutt & Jeff strip. Providing odd marginal commentary in each film are the stick-figures Joys and Gloom.