Clyde Geronimi, Jack Kinney, Hamilton Luske, Joshua Meador & Robert Cormack (1946)

Casey at the Bat
Peter and the Wolf
The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met

Make Mine Music is a 1946 animated musical anthology film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. It is the 8th Disney feature animated film, released on April 20, 1946.

During World War II, much of Walt Disney’s staff was drafted into the army, and those that remained were called upon by the U.S. government to make training and propaganda films. As a result, the studio was littered with unfinished story ideas. In order to keep the feature film division alive during this difficult time, the studio released six package films including this one, made up of various unrelated segments set to music. This is the third package film, following Saludos Amigos and The Three Caballeros. The film was entered into the 1946 Cannes Film Festival.

The musical short stories included in the Make Mine Music anthology include The Martins and the Coys, Blue Bayou, All the Cats Join In, Without You, Casey at the Bat, Two Silhouettes, Peter and the Wolf, Johnnie Fedora and Alice Bluebonnet, and The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met.

“The animation, color and music, the swing versus symph, and the imagination, execution and delineation—that this Disney feature (two years in the making) may command widest attention yet. The blend of cartoon with human action has been evidenced before; here Disney has retained all his characters in their basic art form, but endowed them with human qualities, voices and treatments, which is another step forward in the field where cartoons graduate into the field of the classics.”

Abel Green of Variety

“More entertaining than others, but all are good, and each has something to please movie-goers of all tastes and ages. It is a delightful blend of comedy, music, pathos, animation, and color, given a most imaginative treatment.”

Harrison’s Reports

“A brilliant abstraction wherein fanciful musical instruments dance gayly on sliding color disks, sets of romping fingers race blithely down tapes of piano keys and musical notes fly wildly through the multi-hued atmosphere—all to the tingling accompaniment of Benny Goodman’s quartet playing the ancient and melodious torch song, ‘After You’re Gone’. Color, form and music blend dynamically in this bit, and a rich stimulant of sensuous rhythm is excitingly achieved.”

Bosley Crowther of The New York Times

“A picture of much inventiveness and imagination. The lighter the picture is, the more is its excellence demonstrated, it might be noted. And while music is the keynote of the production, it ranges well into comedy, and plentifully into swing.”

Edwin Schallert of the Los Angeles Times

Norman Ferguson (1944)

The Three Caballeros is a 1944 live-action animated musical produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. It was the 7th Walt Disney animated feature film, and it marks the 10th anniversary of Donald Duck and plots an adventure through parts of Latin America. It is notable for being one of the first feature-length films to incorporate traditional animation with live-action actors.

The film is a series of self-contained segments, strung together by Donald Duck opening birthday gifts from his Latin American friends. Several Latin American stars appear, including singers Aurora Miranda and Dora Luz, as well as singer and dancer Carmen Molina.

The film was produced as part of the studio’s goodwill message for Latin America. The film stars Donald Duck, who in the course of the film is joined by old friend José Carioca, the cigar-smoking parrot from Saludos Amigos, who represents Brazil, and later becomes friends with a pistol-packing rooster named Panchito Pistoles, who represents Mexico.

This film was directed by animation great Norman Ferguson, who was a central contributor to the studio’s artistic development in the 1930s into the 40s. He created Pluto, Peg-Leg Pete, the Big Bad Wolf, and was the primary animator for the witch in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

Sequence directors for the film included Clyde Geronimi, Jack Kinney, Bill Roberts, and Harold Young.

Friz Freleng (1943)

A group of mice are unwittingly enslaved by a cat.

Fifth Column Mouse is a 1943 Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies animated cartoon directed by Friz Freleng. The short was released on March 6, 1943. The cartoon features a band of mice who engage in war against a cat. This is a wartime propaganda film, with the cat symbolizing the Axis powers. A single mouse represents the fifth column, working for the cat and suggesting an appeasement policy.

The cat is treated as the enemy and symbolizes the Axis. After the cat whispers his plan inside the dim-witted mouse’s ear the cat’s face briefly mimics that of a stereotypically caricatured Japanese, while Japanese sounding music is briefly heard. When the mouse agrees to fulfill the plan, he gives the cat a Nazi salute. The grey mouse represents the policy of appeasement, and the overall theme of the short is that the policy does not work against the Axis and will lead to ruin. When the cat’s fur is shaved off, the first four notes of Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Fifth Symphony” are played; these notes were used by the Allied Forces as a symbol for “V” (for “victory”) in Morse code; also, when shaved four tufts of hair are left on the cat’s back – three short and one long tuft – equivalent to the Morse Code dit-dit-dit-dah – which is the letter “V”.

Near the end of the cartoon, the brown mice sing “We did it before and We can do it again”, a patriotic chant that was often used in American films during World War II. The song was co-written in 1941 by Tin Pan Alley songwriter Charles Tobias as a response to the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor. During the song, a mouse version of the “Buy War Bonds and Stamps” poster can be seen.

Richard Williams (1958)

Depicts the dreams, ideas, and struggles of three men (representing “truth,” “beauty,” and “good”) who settle on a tiny island.

The first film directed by Richard Williams, the master animator behind Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) and The Thief and the Cobbler (1993).

In his scathing take on ideology, three little men each have an idea – but only one – that come to clash on a desert island.

1958 – BAFTA Award Winner for Best Animated Film

Self-financed, Richard’s first film was a half-hour philosophical argument without words.

Walt Disney (1942)

Disney animators tour South America and present four animated shorts inspired by their trip.

Saludos Amigos is a 1942 American live-action animated anthology film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. It is the 6th Disney animated feature film. Set in Latin America, it is made up of four different segments; Donald Duck stars in two of them and Goofy stars in one. It also features the first appearance of José Carioca, the Brazilian cigar-smoking parrot. Saludos Amigos premiered in Rio de Janeiro on August 24, 1942. It was released in the United States on February 6, 1943. Saludos Amigos was popular enough that Walt Disney decided to make another film about Latin America, The Three Caballeros, to be produced two years later. At 42 minutes, it is Disney’s shortest animated feature to date.

Directed by Wilfred Jackson, Jack Kinney, Hamilton Luske, Norman Ferguson, and Bill Roberts.

Story written by Homer Brightman, William Cottrell, Richard Huemer, Joe Grant, Harold Reeves, Ted Sears, Webb Smith, Roy Williams, and Ralph Wright.

In early 1941, before U.S. entry into World War II, the United States Department of State commissioned a Disney goodwill tour of South America, intended to lead to a movie to be shown in the US, Central, and South America as part of the Good Neighbor Policy. This was being done because several Latin American governments had close ties with Nazi Germany, and the US government wanted to counteract those ties. Mickey Mouse and other Disney characters were popular in Latin America, and Walt Disney acted as ambassador. The tour, facilitated by Nelson Rockefeller, who had recently been appointed as Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs (CIAA), took Disney and a group of roughly twenty composers, artists, technicians, etc. from his studio to South America, mainly to Brazil and Argentina, but also to Chile and Peru.

The film itself was given federal loan guarantees, because the Disney studio had over-expanded just before European markets were closed to them by the war, and because Disney was struggling with labor unrest at the time (including a strike that was underway at the time the goodwill journey began).

The film included live-action documentary sequences featuring footage of modern Latin American cities with skyscrapers and fashionably dressed residents. This surprised many contemporary US viewers, who associated such images only with US and European cities, and contributed to a changing impression of Latin America. Film historian Alfred Charles Richard Jr. has commented that Saludos Amigos “did more to cement a community of interest between peoples of the Americas in a few months than the State Department had in fifty years”.

The film also inspired Chilean cartoonist René Ríos Boettiger to create Condorito, one of Latin America’s most ubiquitous cartoon characters. Ríos perceived that the character Pedro, a small, incapable airplane, was a slight to Chileans and created a comic that could supposedly rival Disney’s comic characters.

Mark Hall & Chris Taylor (1983)

Toad (David Jason), Rat (Ian Carmichael), Mole (Richard Pearson), and Badger (Sir Michael Hordern) follow animal etiquette in this version of Kenneth Grahame’s classic, in stop-motion model animation.

The Wind in the Willows is a 1983 British stop motion animated film produced by Cosgrove Hall Films for Thames Television and aired on the ITV network. The film is based on Kenneth Grahame’s classic 1908 novel The Wind in the Willows. It won a BAFTA award and an international Emmy award.

Between 1984 and 1990, Cosgrove-Hall subsequently made a 52-episode television series, with the film serving as a pilot. The film’s music and songs are composed by Keith Hopwood, late of Herman’s Hermits, and Malcolm Rowe. The Stone Roses guitarist John Squire worked on the series as a set artist.

Ub Iwerks (1935)

Balloon Land is a 1935 animated short cartoon film produced and directed by Ub Iwerks as part of the ComiColor Cartoons series. The cartoon is about a place called Balloon Land, whose residents are made entirely out of balloons. The villain in the cartoon is the Pincushion Man, a character who walks around Balloon Land popping the inhabitants with pins.

Starring Billy Bletcher as the Pincushion Man and Leone LeDoux as the Balloon Alarm Babies.

Ub Iwerks was an American animator, cartoonist, character designer, inventor, and special effects technician, who designed Oswald the Lucky Rabbit and Mickey Mouse. Iwerks produced alongside Walt Disney and won numerous awards, including multiple Academy Awards.

The ComiColor Cartoon series is a series of 25 animated short subjects produced by Ub Iwerks from 1933 to 1936. The series was the last produced by Iwerks Studio; after losing distributor Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1934, the Iwerks studio’s senior company Celebrity Pictures had to distribute the films itself. The series was shot exclusively in Cinecolor, a two-color process.

Most of the ComiColor entries were based upon popular fairy tales and other familiar stories, including Jack and the Beanstalk, Old Mother Hubbard, The Bremen Town Musicians, and The Headless Horseman.

Hugh Harman (1931)

Bosko the Doughboy is a one-reel 1931 short subject animated cartoon and is part of the Bosko series. It was directed by Hugh Harman, and first released on October 17, 1931 as part of the Looney Tunes series from Harman-Ising Productions and distributed by Warner Bros.

Film score composed by Frank Marsales

Drawn by Rollin Hamilton & Max Maxwell

Bosko the Doughboy is notable for its departure from the standard cartoon formula of its era. Bosko is usually infallibly happy and chipper; Doughboy forces him to drop this demeanor and fight back. Other Bosko shorts concentrate primarily on Bosko cavorting with other characters in a musical wonderland; in Doughboy, Bosko can’t dance more than a few seconds before coming under enemy fire. Bosko’s cartoons generally have little to no conflict; Doughboy is nothing but fighting. In short, Bosko the Doughboy is almost a total departure from other shorts in the series (and from those of other studios of the time). It is usually regarded as a high point of the character’s cartoon career.

Jack King (1935)

Hollywood Capers is a 1935 animated short Looney Tunes film. It stars Beans the Cat in his second solo cartoon, Little Kitty, Oliver Owl, and Porky Pig also makes a cameo.

Beans must sneak past a security guard into a Hollywood film studio. This cartoon features caricatures of W.C. Fields, Charlie Chaplin, Oliver Hardy, and Boris Karloff. This short reuses animation from Buddy’s Beer Garden, specifically the man pouring beer into the mugs. A poster at the bar reads “Hurricane Hardaway”, a reference to director Ben Hardaway. This cartoon entered the public domain in 1963.

Beans the Cat is an animated cartoon character in the Warner Bros. Cartoons series of cartoons from 1935–1936. Beans was the third Warner Bros cartoon character star after Bosko and Buddy. He is voiced by Billy Bletcher and occasionally by Tommy Bond. He was created by director Friz Freleng. The character was featured in nine cartoons made in 1935 and 1936.

Guido Manuli (2012)

A clever 2D cutout animation parodying Disney’s classic Silly Symphony style of cartoons in an absurd and humorous way. Enjoy! Thanks for watching HMC:)

Guido Manuli is an Italian screenwriter, film director, and animator. Born in Cervia in 1939, he started his career in Milan as an illustrator. In 1960 he began collaboration with Bruno Bozzetto, assuming various roles from animator and illustrator to director.

Mannie Davis & John Foster (1947)

The fox convinces the duck that the sky is falling, and the duck tells the hen, and both of them tell the pig, and the three of them tell the King and, the next thing anyone knows is that the whole kingdom is twatting and twittering over the upcoming catastrophe, with the exception of the one who started the rumor. But Mighty Mouse flies in, with a song on his lips, and sets matters straight.

The character was created by story man Izzy Klein as a super-powered housefly named Superfly. Studio head Paul Terry changed the character into a cartoon mouse instead (click here for the Terrytoon theatrical shorts).

Originally created as a parody of Superman, he first appeared in 1942 in a theatrical animated short titled The Mouse of Tomorrow. The original name of the character was Super Mouse, but after 7 cartoons produced in 1942-1943, it was changed in the 1944 cartoon ‘The Wreck of the Hesperus‘ to Mighty Mouse when Paul Terry learned that another character with the same name was being published in comic books. Super Mouse appeared briefly in the Marvel Comics interpretation of the character and was nicknamed Terry the First, as he was the first version of the character.

Mighty Mouse originally had a blue costume with red trunks and a red cape, like Superman, but over time this outfit changed to a yellow costume with red trunks and a red cape, his most popular colors. As with other imitations of Superman, Mighty Mouse’s super powers include flight, super strength, and invulnerability. He has demonstrated the use of X-ray vision in at least one episode, while during several cartoons he used a form of telekinesis that allowed him to command inanimate objects and turn back time. Other cartoons have him leaving a red contrail during flight which he can manipulate at will like a band of solid flexible matter.

The initial formula of each story consisted of an extended setup of a crisis which needs extraordinary help to resolve, after which Mighty Mouse appears to save the day.

Mannie Davis (1950)

Heckle and Jeckle the Talking Magpies in King Tut’s Tomb finds our beloved hecklers in Egypt, inside King Tut’s tomb, where they encounter all sorts of mysterious marvels.

Heckle and Jeckle are postwar animated cartoon characters created by Paul Terry, originally produced at his own Terrytoons animation studio and released through 20th Century Fox. The characters are a pair of identical anthropomorphic yellow-billed magpies.

Guillermo del Toro (2022)

Academy Award-winning filmmaker Guillermo del Toro reinvents the classic tale of the wooden marionette who is magically brought to life in order to mend the heart of a grieving woodcarver named Geppetto. This whimsical, stop-motion film directed by Guillermo del Toro and Mark Gustafson follows the mischievous and disobedient adventures of Pinocchio in his pursuit of a place in the world.

Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio is an upcoming stop-motion musical fantasy film directed by Guillermo del Toro and Mark Gustafson, based on Gris Grimly’s design from his 2002 edition of the 1883 Italian novel The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. The film was written by del Toro and Patrick McHale.

Produced by Netflix Animation, The Jim Henson Company and ShadowMachine in co-production with Pathé, El Taller del Chucho, and Necropia Entertainment, Pinocchio was announced by Del Toro in 2008 and originally scheduled to be released in 2013 or 2014, but the project went into development hell. In January 2017, McHale was announced to co-write the script, but in November 2017, the production was suspended as no studios were willing to provide financing. The production was revived the following year after being acquired by Netflix.

Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio is scheduled to be released in select theaters in November 2022, followed by its streaming release on Netflix in December 2022.

Mike Judge (2022)

The iconic animated duo of Beavis and Butt-Head are back and dumber than ever! The ’90s pop-culture phenomenons return, voiced by creator Mike Judge, to confound common sense, torment each other, and showcase some of the dumbest comedy imaginable. Mike Judge’s Beavis and Butt-Head is streaming August 4th, exclusively on Paramount+!

“They watch YouTube videos and TikTok videos now. We have episodes where they’re middle-aged. Butt-Head is just this big old useless guy.”

Mike Judge

If you’re a fan of Beavis and Butt-Head, 2022 is a great year. That’s because not only has Paramount+ released a new movie, Beavis & Butt-Head Do the Universe, the streamer is about to launch a new series, Mike Judge’s Beavis and Butt-Head, on August 4. However, unlike the original Beavis and Butt-Head series, which had them talking over music videos, in the new series, they’re also watching YouTube and TikTok. As you can see in the first clip, this seems like a match made in heaven.

Shortly before taking the San Diego Comic-Con stage, Mike Judge stopped by the Collider studio. During the interview, he talked about making Idiocracy and the growing popularity of the movie, how he might be filming his next live-action movie next year, how all the original Beavis and Butt-Head episodes might finally be released with the music videos, and the new series and what fans can look forward to.

Jerry Garcia (1977)

UNLOCKED! Enjoy The Grateful Dead Movie while there’s still time.

The Grateful Dead Movie, released in 1977 and directed by Jerry Garcia, is a film that captures live performances from rock band the Grateful Dead during an October 1974 five-night run at Winterland in San Francisco. These concerts marked the beginning of a hiatus, with the October 20, 1974 show billed as “The Last One”. The band would return to touring in 1976. The film features the “Wall of Sound” concert sound system that the Dead used for all of 1974. The movie also portrays the burgeoning Deadhead scene.

To document the Grateful Dead experience, the film showcases the fans more than was usual in a concert movie at the time. They are shown enjoying the show, discussing the music and the band, and what it was like to be a Deadhead in the mid-1970s. The film also includes interviews with members of the Dead and vintage footage from their colorful history and early days in the band. The film opens with a uniquely Grateful Dead animated sequence, featuring the “Uncle Sam skeleton”. The psychedelic animation was created by Gary Gutierrez, using techniques that he developed specifically for the project. Stanley Mouse did the title art.

Weird Al Yankovic (2011)

Weird Al’s parody of Nothin’ On You by B.o.B. featuring Bruno Mars

Weird Al is an American singer, musician, and actor who is known for humorous songs that make light of pop culture and often parody specific songs by contemporary musical acts.

Connie Rasinski (1940)

Not to be confused with William Shakespeare’s play of the same name.

Little Cute Chickie Duck loves little lucky Dinky Duck but they have a quarrel, which leads their parents to have a quarrel, which leads to a big-duck brawl…careful, there…which leads to much ado about nothing as Chickie and Dinky have made up and gone floating together.

This is the second Dinky Duck Terrytoons cartoon. It’s also the only cartoon that showed Dinky not as an orphan but actually having biological duck parents until later cartoons.

Bob Marley & The Wailers (1980)

“The road of life is rocky; And you may stumble too. So while you point your fingers, someone else is judging you”

Bob Marley

Bob Marley & The Wailers Could You Be Loved official music video. Inspired by Cedella Marley and all that she’s doing for women’s soccer in the Caribbean + Latin America through her Football is Freedom initiative. Stay positive & keep going 💚

Animation and direction by Vanja Vikalo LINNCH

Vanja Vikalo LINNCH is a multidisciplinary artist residing in Belgrade. Calling himself primarily an illustrator and an animator, Linnch creates characters and settings with surprising internal logic, playing with different visual forms. A unique entirety of his expression comes through each project he’s working on, both personal and commercial. Clients and artists include Bob Marley, 2 Chainz, YE (Kanye West), Ty Dolla $ign, FKA Twigs, Jadakiss, Trouble, Quavo, Who See, UNICEF, Coca-Cola, Samsung, Vice, Tuborg, Vip Mobile, and many more. Linnch’s work doesn’t stray from commentary and activism, they’re bold and they have a commanding presence, usually communicating with the audience through humor and skepticism. Talk will be revolving around career defining projects and stories behind them, but also his path from illustrator and muralist to animator/animation director.

Justin Halpern, Patrick Schumacker & Dean Lorey (2022)

The mayhem and madness continue in season three of this biting and uproarious adult animated comedy series. Wrapping up their “Eat. Bang! Kill. Tour,” Harley Quinn (Kaley Cuoco) and Poison Ivy (Lake Bell) return to Gotham as the new power couple of DC villainy. Along with their ragtag crew – King Shark (Ron Funches), Clayface (Alan Tudyk), Frank the Plant (JB Smoove) – “Harlivy” strives to become the best version of themselves while also working towards Ivy’s long desired plan of transforming Gotham into an Eden paradise.

Season 3 of Harley Quinn premieres July 28 on HBO Max.

Genndy Tartakovsky (2022)

Emmy Award-winning Primal returns for a new season that leads Spear and Fang on bigger, more brutal adventures than ever before. Season 2 of Primal premieres July 21 on [adult swim] & the 22 on HBO Max. Primal is an American adult animated action adventure television series created and directed by Genndy Tartakovsky for Cartoon Network’s late night programming block Adult Swim. Primal draws in elements of fantasy, horror, action, and adventure. The first episode premiered on Adult Swim on October 8, 2019.

Genndy Tartakovsky is a Russian-American animator, director, producer, screenwriter, voice actor, storyboard artist, comic book writer and artist. He is best known as the creator of various animated television series on Cartoon Network and Adult Swim, including Dexter’s Laboratory, Samurai Jack, Star Wars: Clone Wars, Sym-Bionic Titan, and Primal.

Bruno Bozzetto (1974)

Just like we exploit earth by extracting its petrol, so do mosquitos behave over the human body by sucking our blood. An animated, allegorical film which portrays the activities of a group of mosquitos who build their city around a man’s vital fluids.

Hungry mosquitos, in search of a meal, find that fruit, flowers and other such fare doesn’t satisfy. One enterprising bug hits the jackpot – a human! However, the victim vigorously resists joining the food chain, causing a number of winged casualties. The little buggers wait until the man falls asleep, then set up a number of enterprises: cafes, bars, filling stations, all serving blood. Things are going well, but then the mosquito Cosa Nostra moves in, and ramp production into high gear.

“Synthesis is the most important goal for an artist. It’s a marvellous and yet difficult goal to achieve.”

Bruno Bozzetto

A 60-years career behind, Bruno Bozzetto is esteemed as one of the most eclectic and influential Cartoonists of yesterday and of today. His minimalist style focuses on the content more than the aesthetics to talk about universal themes with an educational approach and through a scratching irony that make his films suitable for a young adult audience.

From the 1960s up to today he has made over three hundreds films that earned him 130 acknowledgments among which the remarkable Winsor McCay Award, 5 Silver Ribbon Awards, an Honorary degree, 15 Awards to the Career, an Oscar Nomination for Grasshoppers, and a Berlin Golden Bear Award for Mr Tao.

Today Bruno keeps working in the industry by creating new subjects, by animating and sketching on his own, but also cooperating to wider projects through Bozzetto&Co Studio of Production. He also takes part to films festivals, events and masterclasses in Italy and worldwide.

Several exhibitions have been set up through the years, the most prestigious of which is “Animation, Maestro!”, wanted by Diane Disney Miller in 2013, at the Walt Disney Family Museum of San Francisco. The Bozzetto crew believes that an original artwork-based exhibition is the best way to show the magic of animation through original sketches, storyboards and especially cels.

To learn more about Bruno Bozzetto or to see more of his work, please visit his website: https://www.bozzetto.com

Sonya Kendel (2012)

“I’m a perfectionist and that’s a very dangerous quality to have in animation.”

Sonya Kendel

Sick and tired of everything in his life, Pishto decides to leave everything behind. One autumn Pishto had had enough of it and decided to leave his home village for good. Film was shot with the financial support of the Ministry of Culture of Russian Federation.

Film was the participant of 38 international festivals, including:
London international animation festival LIAF (Great Britain, 2013)
New York International Children’s Film Festival (USA, 2013)
Hiroshima International Animation Festival (Japan, 2012)
International Festival for Documentary and Animated Film DOK Leipzig (Germany, 2012)
Zlin Film Festival (Czech Republic, 2012)

Awards
Prize «The Best Animation Film», Suzdal Animation Film Festival (Russia, 2012)
1st Prize «The Best Animation Film», Festival of Students and Debut Films «St. Anna» (Russia, 2012)

Francine Desbiens & Bretislav Pojar (1981)

Under the guise of a pretty fairy tale, this animated short makes a strong political statement. Animated paper cut-outs enact a drama in which a dictator imposes his delusions on his unfortunate subjects. The humour is black and, despite the absence of dialogue, the message is crystal clear.

A giant statue of the letter “E” arrives in the park. One man sees it as “B”; they are preparing to cart him off to the looney bin when a doctor arrives and determines the man needs glasses. Then the king arrives; he also sees “B”. He tries on the glasses, sees “E”, and pins a medal on the doctor then has his goon squad come and bash on everyone’s head until they too see “B”.

The School of Life (2016)

I’m proud to say that Ralph Waldo Emerson is an ancestor of mine on my mom’s side of the family. Ralph Waldo Emerson taught us about the presence of nature and something a little divine inside all of us. He was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, abolitionist, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and his ideology was disseminated through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.

Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of transcendentalism in his 1836 essay Nature. Following this work, he gave a speech entitled The American Scholar in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. considered to be America’s “intellectual Declaration of Independence.”

Fleischer Studios (1935)

Betty flies to Japan to do a show, and sings the title number. She then dons a kimono, and sings it again in Japanese.

Got a language all my own known in every foreign home! You surely know it is Boop-Doopy-Doopy-Doo-Boop-Oopy-Doop-Bop!

Betty Boop

Betty Boop flies to Japan and takes her stage act on the road, and plays to great acclaim, and sings the title number “A Language All My Own” in both English and Japanese. After singing to a cheering New York audience, Betty sets off in her plane for the Land of the Rising Sun, depicted literally as such with an emblematic sunrise over Mt. Fuji. When Betty arrives in Japan she sings for her cheering Japanese fans.

Mae Questel as Betty Boop

Animation by Myron Waldman and Hicks Lokey

Music by Sammy Timberg

Bruno Bozzetto & Guido Manuli (1973)

Lines uttered in all freedom, all joined by a common theme, that is music; from classical to opera music nothing escapes the irreverent and hilarious film’s criticism.

Most of Opera is busy mocking classic opera scenes, but towards its close it turns into social satire, and represents the self-destruction of the world.

Guido Manuli is one of the most influential Italian animators and film directors of his time. He started a long-standing collaboration with animation legend Bruno Bozzetto and together they worked on cult movies like West and Soda, Vip Mio Fratello Superuomo, Allegro Non Troppo, and many more. In 1991 he won the Davide of Donatello Award for Best Screenplay for Volere Volare, a mixed technique feature film. Later in the 90s he directed the TV movie Monster Mash, followed by the theatrical feature Aida degli Alberi in 2001 and the CGI animated series Water and Bubbles in 2008/’09. During the last 40 years he also created dozens of short films that won scores of accolades worldwide. Works such as Opera (1973), Fantabiblical (1977), Count Down (1978), Just a Kiss (1983), and Incubus (1985) were screened and widely acclaimed at every major animation Festival. His energetic style was often compared to Tex Avery.

Bruno Bozzetto is an Italian cartoon animator and film director, creator of many short pieces, mainly of a political Hiii or satirical nature. He created his first animated short “Tapum! the weapons’ story” in 1958 at the age of 20. His most famous character, a hapless little man named “Signor Rossi”, has been featured in many animated shorts as well as starring in three feature films: Mr. Rossi Looks for Happiness, Mr. Rossi’s Dreams, and Mr. Rossi’s Vacation.

Amy Winfrey & Joanna Calo (2018)

Diane divorces Mr. Peanutbutter and moves into a shabby studio. Feeling melancholy, she travels to Vietnam to get away from it all.

“The real reason you go to Vietnam is because you accidentally see your soon to be ex-husband kiss someone else. At first you think, Oh, it’s a fling. Whatever. They’re drunk. It’s a party. But then he puts his hand on the small of her back exactly the way he used to do to you. It means I got you, and when he did it to you, it made you feel safe. And you realize he’ll never do that to you again. And it breaks your heart again. After your heart was so broken that you thought it could never get any more broken.”

– Diane Nguyen

BoJack Horseman is an American adult animated tragicomedy sitcom created by Raphael Bob-Waksberg. It stars the voices of Will Arnett, Amy Sedaris, Alison Brie, Paul F. Tompkins, and Aaron Paul.

Alex Toth (1966)

Space Ghost is a Saturday morning superhero cartoon produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. It first aired on CBS from September 10, 1966, to September 16, 1967. The series was composed of two unrelated segments, Space Ghost and Dino Boy in the Lost Valley. The series was created by Alex Toth and directed by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera.

Space Ghost, along with teenaged sidekicks Jan and Jace and their pet monkey Blip, fight villains in outer space. Usually, Space Ghost’s sidekicks would get captured or trapped by the villains, and Space Ghost would have to defeat the villains and save the day. His enemies included Zorak, Brak and his brother Sisto, the Creature King, the Black Widow (a.k.a. the Spider Woman), Lokar, Moltar, and Metallus.

“Saturday-morning cartoon” is a colloquial term for the original animated series programming that was typically scheduled on Saturday and Sunday mornings in the United States on the “Big Three” television networks

Raphael Bob-Waksberg & Aaron Long (2020)

Nice While It Lasted is the series finale of the animated comedy-drama series BoJack Horseman. Written by series creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg and directed by Aaron Long, it was released on January 31, 2020.

Bojack Horseman is arrested for breaking and entering, but is granted a furlough to attend the wedding of his ex-girlfriend, Princess Carolyn. The episode was widely praised as a poignant ending to the series.

Patrick Smith (1985)

“There’s a way we talk and it includes profanity. We never figured we’d be arrested for it.”

– Mike D

Interview by Rocci Fisch for ABC News Radio 1985, Washington, D.C. Cassette Tape

More Beasties: http://blankonblank.org/interviews/be…

Executive Producer: David Gerlach

Animator: Patrick Smith

Beastie Boys were an American rap group from New York City, formed in 1981. The group was composed of Michael “Mike D” Diamond, Adam “MCA” Yauch, and Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz. Beastie Boys were formed out of members of experimental hardcore punk band the Young Aborigines in 1978, with Diamond as vocalist, Jeremy Shatan on bass guitar, John Berry on guitar, and Kate Schellenbach on drums. When Shatan left in 1981, Yauch replaced him on bass and the band changed their name to Beastie Boys. Berry left shortly thereafter and was replaced by Horovitz.

Vitist https://beastieboys.com/ for more Beastie Boys!