Hani Dombe & Tom Kouris (2016)

Award Winning Animated Stop Motion Short Film

Lili refuses to let go of her childhood and fights a sandstorm that threatens to take it away. In the heart of the storm she rediscovers the joy of childhood, but is forced to choose between illusion and reality.

Music & sound: Gil Landau

Supported by: Israel Lottery Council For Culture & Arts, Gesher multicultural film fund

Pat Sullivan & Otto Messmer (1929)

This Felix the Cat cartoon doesn’t have much of a plot but rather is a series of random adventures starring our hero and a fox. It’s a silent cartoon that had crude sound added after the fact by distributor Jacques Kopfstein. This cartoon looks to have been made earlier than 1929. It’s no wonder that Disney and Fleischer made serious inroads into Felix’s popularity.

Felix the Cat is a funny cartoon character created in 1919 by Pat Sullivan and Otto Messmer during the silent film era. An anthropomorphic black cat with white eyes, a black body, and a giant grin, he is one of the most recognized cartoon characters in film history. Felix was the first animated character to attain a level of popularity sufficient to draw movie audiences.

Felix originated from the studio of Australian cartoonist/film entrepreneur Pat Sullivan. Either Sullivan himself or his lead animator, American Otto Messmer, created the character. What is certain is that Felix emerged from Sullivan’s studio, and cartoons featuring the character enjoyed success and popularity in popular culture. Aside from the animated shorts, Felix starred in a comic strip (drawn by Sullivan, Messmer, and later Joe Oriolo) beginning in 1923, and his image soon adorned merchandise such as ceramics, toys, and postcards.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard (2021)

Written and Directed by Ivan Dixon. Produced and animated at Studio Showoff https://www.studioshowoff.com

Amby: Percussion

Cavs: Drums

Joey: Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Vocals, Synthesiser, Keyboards

Stu: Bass Guitar, Synthesiser

Recorded by King Gizzard in the year 3021

Mixed by Stu Mackenzie

Mastered by Joe Carra

Just on the down low, I’m feeling pretty low.
Some days I feel fine.
Others
 I don’t know.
I got a sensory road block.
I’m in a binary mind lock.
So I’m dancing in lockstep to music that I can’t hear.

Failing farmer; toxic crop.
Two white hearts to shake shit up.
Pay someone to taste, to smell and punch through the dry wall inside my skull.
Interior people.
A lens flare in my subconscious.
The gap of death, I no longer fear.
The Interior People.

I keep thinking someone.
Is standing beside me.
But when I turn to grab ‘em.
They jump back inside of me.
They tell me to do things.
And so does the radio.
And learn from the satellite.
That orbits my shadow.
Instigate the paradigm.
Play the game and drink the wine.
Communicate with the afterglow that radiates between the wall.

Failing farmer; toxic crop.
Two white hearts to shake shit up.
Pay someone to taste, to smell and punch through the dry wall inside my skull.

Interior people.
A lens flare in my subconscious.
The gap of death, I no longer fear.
The Interior People.

Gary K. Wolf & Richard Williams (1988)

“I’m not bad, I’m just drawn that way.”

-Jessica Rabbit

Jessica Rabbit is a fictional character in Who Censored Roger Rabbit? and its film adaptation Who Framed Roger Rabbit? She is depicted as Roger’s human toon wife. Jessica is renowned as one of the best-known sex symbols in animation.

Author Gary K. Wolf based Jessica primarily on the cartoon character Red from Tex Avery’s Red Hot Riding Hood. The film version of the character was inspired by various actresses. Richard Williams explained, “I tried to make her like Rita Hayworth; we took her hair from Veronica Lake, and Zemeckis kept saying, ‘What about the look Lauren Bacall had?'” He described that combination as an “ultimate male fantasy, drawn by a cartoonist.”

The song Why Don’t You Do Right? is an American blues and jazz-influenced pop song written by “Kansas Joe” McCoy and Herb Morand in 1936. Both men are given composer credits on the original 78 record label, although Morand’s name is misspelled. A minor key twelve-bar blues with a few chord substitutions, it is considered a classic “woman’s blues” song and has become a standard.

In 1936, the Harlem Hamfats recorded Why Don’t You Do Right? Band member McCoy later rewrote the song, refining the composition and lyrics. The new tune was recorded by Lil Green in 1941, with guitar by William “Big Bill” Broonzy. The recording was an early jazz and blues hit.[3]

The song has its roots in blues music and originally dealt with a marijuana smoker reminiscing about lost financial opportunities. As it was rewritten, it takes on the perspective of the female partner, who chastises her man for his irresponsible ways: “Why don’t you do right, like some other men do? Get out of here and get me some money too.”

One of the best-known versions of the song was recorded by Peggy Lee and Benny Goodman on July 27, 1942, in New York. Featured in the 1943 film, Stage Door Canteen, it sold over one million copies and brought her to nationwide attention.

Lee often stated that Green’s recording was influential to her music. In a 1971 interview she said, “I had the record, and I used to play it over and over in my dressing room, which was next to Benny Goodman … Finally … he said, ‘I think you really like that song.’ I said, ‘Oh, I love it.’ He said, ‘Would you like to sing it?'” Lee said yes, so Goodman had an arrangement made of it for Lee to sing.

In 1988 Why Don’t You Do Right? was sung by Jessica Rabbit in a very provocative way.

Clenet, Mazevet, Paccolat & Diaz (2013)

A cute short film about friendship

A house uproots “herself” and goes on an adventure with other kinds of houses.

Directed by Pierre Clenet, Romain Mazevet, Stéphane Paccolat, and Alejandro Diaz

Writen by Stéphane Paccolat

On a cold and serene night, an intrepid house with a burning desire to survive decides to leave its hometown and the decrepit town of its childhood and heads off into the unknown. Eventually, as the solitary house walks alone the empty streets, on its way, new friends await, after all, there’s an entirely new world out there for it to explore. —Nick Riganas

Foo Fighters (2021)

Foo Fighters have released a trippy animated music video for their song Chasing Birds, from the band’s latest album Medicine at Midnight.

The visual builds off of the song’s first lyric (“Chasing birds to get high/My head is in the clouds”) by depicting Dave Grohl and the rest of the Foos going on a long, strange trip in the desert. After having some fun with the colorful, psychedelic imagery around them, Foo Fighters find themselves entrapped in a dark, spooky cavern — the video’s version of hell as mentioned in the song. What will help the band release themselves from their mental prison? The power of music, of course.

Foo Fighters released Medicine at Midnight in February, after the album was delayed due to the Covid-19 pandemic. That same month, the band performed a cover of the Bee Gees’ You Should Be Dancing on BBC Radio 2 Sofa Session after Grohl was inspired by the recent Bee Gees documentary. They also performed another Gibb brothers’ classic, Andy Gibb’s Shadow Dancing, during the Rock-N-Relief livestream in March.

– by Claire Shaffer of Rolling Stone Magazine

Animation Director: Emlyn Davies

Animation Co-Director: Josh Hicks

Lead Character Artist: Eder Carfagnini

Character Artists: Mark Proctor, Francis Ogunyanwo

3D Artists: Emlyn Davies, Colin Wood, Rhodri Teifi, Zach F Evans, Josh Hicks, Mark Proctor, Craig Rothwell, Phil Highfield

FX Artists: Colin Wood, Zach F Evans

Lighting: Emlyn Davies, Colin Wood, Rhodri Teifi, Zach F Evans

Lead 3D Animator: Alan Towndrow

3D Animators: Alex Watson, Mervenur Ulcan, Joanna Adamska, BeĂĄta Ujj, Jesiel Almeida, Brian Martinez, Sebastian Pfeifer

Rigging: Alan Towndrow, Gene Magtoto, Dan Dan Kang

Texture Artists: Colin Wood, Rhodri Teifi, Zach F Evans

Character Concepts: Josh Hicks, Guillaume Poitel

Storyboards: Josh Hicks, Mark Proctor

Compositing: Rhodri Teifi, Zach F Evans, Sebastian Pfeifer

Editing: Josh Hicks

Mcbaise featuring Kamggarn (2021)

Taken from Mcbaise’s latest album TUBES

Written and performed by mcbess

Animated by mcbess

Mixed & recorded by Alexis Muffat-Meridol

Mastered by Alex Gopher

Guest guitar solo by Kamggarn

Graded by Andy at Black Kite Studios

Mcbaise lives between London and Auribeau sur siagne and has been described as “probably the best thing to ever come out of Cannes”. he spends most of his time eating pan bagna on the beach. His style is a kind of smooth yachty rock.

Visit Mcbaise at https://mcbaise.com/

Hugh Harman, William Hannah & Paul Fennell (1936)

A Happy Harmonies cartoon.

To Spring is a 1936 animated musical short produced by Hugh Harman and Rudolf Ising for the MGM cartoon studio’s Happy Harmonies series. Although the production credit goes to Harman and Ising, this short was actually the first cartoon to be directed by the future cartoon giant William Hanna, along with animator Paul Fennell.

The title is a play on words used to represent the season of spring and action the gnomes must take to wake up and get to work. This cartoon uses the bold and vibrant colors synonymous with springtime, and is an excellent example of the Technicolor process that was very popular at the time.

Fleischer Studios (1930)

A Bimbo cartoon (though he is still unnamed).

Bimbo is the hot dog vendor at an opera led by a Leopold Stokowski-like lion, with plenty of operatic mice. Includes a repeating gag of a hippo coming and going through the seats, displacing patrons.

Animated by Seymour Kneitel & Al Eugster

For the Fleischer brothers, the transition to sound was relatively easy. With the new contract with Paramount Pictures, and without the burden of Red Seal Pictures and Alfred Weiss, Max Fleischer was free to experiment with new, bold ideas. First he changed the name of the Ko-Ko Song Cartunes series to Screen Songs. Although the Screen Songs were successful, Fleischer felt that it wasn’t enough. Walt Disney also seemed to gain a great amount of fame through his sound cartoons. Max decided to work with his brother Dave on a new series of cartoons where the characters did more than just simply dance to the music of the “bouncing ball”. The name for the new series was to be Talkartoons. When the idea was pitched to Paramount, they leaped at the opportunity.

The Talkartoons started out as one-shot cartoons. The first entry in the series was Noah’s Lark, released on October 26, 1929. Although a Fleischer cartoon, it appeared to be patterned after the Aesop’s Film Fables of Paul Terry. In it, a Farmer Al Falfa-esque Noah allows the animals of his ark to visit Luna Park. When he brings them back into the ship, the weight is so heavy that it sinks. In the end, Noah chases topless mermaids throughout the ocean waters. Lark has very few gray tones, very much like the Screen Songs produced during the same time and the earlier Fleischer silent works. It also included copyright-free songs, mostly utilized from old 78-rpm’s.

The series began to take a new direction, however, with the arrival of Max and Dave’s brother, Lou Fleischer, whose skills in music and mathematics made a great impact at the studio. A dog named Bimbo gradually became the featured character of the series. The first cartoon that featured Bimbo was Hot Dog (1930), the first Fleischer cartoon to use a full range of greys. New animators such as Grim Natwick, Shamus Culhane, and Rudy Zamora began entering the Fleischer Studio, with new ideas that pushed the Talkartoons into a league of their own. Natwick especially had an off-beat style of animating that helped give the shorts more of a surreal quality. Perhaps his greatest contribution to the Talkartoons series and the Fleischer Studio was the creation of Betty Boop with Dizzy Dishes in 1930.

By late 1931, Betty Boop dominated the series. Koko the Clown was brought out of retirement from the silent days as a third character to Betty and Bimbo. By 1932, the series was at an inevitable end and instead, Betty Boop would be given her own series, with Bimbo and Koko as secondary characters.

Les Clark (1958)

Paul Bunyan is a 1958 American animated musical short film produced by Walt Disney Productions. The short was based on the North American folk hero and lumberjack Paul Bunyan and was inspired after meeting with Les Kangas of Paul Bunyan Productions, who gave Disney the idea for the film.

Story by Lance Nolley & Ted Berman

Animation by John Sibley, George Nicholas, Bob Youngouist, George Goepper, Fred Kopietz, Ken Hultgren, Jerry Hathcock, Jack Parr, & Jack Boyd (effects animation)

Wilfred Jackson (1935)

Music Land is a Silly Symphony that debuted on October 5, 1935.

The lore of ancient fable has no equal to the jolly Land of Jazz,
Which lay within a wild, discordant sea, across the way from long-hair Land of Symphony.
Yet here you’ll find no mere Shakespearian sequel (though true folly still it has):
Our star-cross’d lovers bravely face adversity, and true love turns cacophony to harmony!

In an attempt to bridge the gap between classical music and jazz, the short features music from Beethoven’s Eroica and Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyries, as well as various popular classical, jazz, and miscellaneous tunes. The film contains no actual speech, but has the characters instead communicate with musical tones, with each ‘speaking’ through use of the sound of the particular instrument upon which they are based.

Hugh Harman & Rudolf Ising (1930)

Congo Jazz is a Looney Tunes cartoon starring Warner Bros.’ first cartoon star, Bosko. The cartoon was released in September 1930. It was distributed by Warner Bros. and The Vitaphone Corporation. Congo Jazz was the first cartoon to feature Bosko’s falsetto voice that he would use for the bulk of the series’ run. It has the earliest instance of a “trombone gobble” in animation.

In 1927, Harman and Ising were still working for the Walt Disney Studios on a series of live-action/animated short subjects known as the Alice Comedies. The two animators created Bosko in 1927 to capitalize on the new “talkie” craze that was sweeping the motion picture industry. They began thinking about making a sound cartoon with Bosko in 1927, before even leaving Walt Disney. Hugh Harman made drawings of the new character and registered it with the copyright office on 3 January 1928.

After leaving Walt Disney in early 1928, Harman and Ising went to work for Charles Mintz on Universal’s second-season Oswald the Lucky Rabbit cartoons. April 1929 found them moving on again, leaving Universal to market their new cartoon character. In May 1929, they produced a short pilot cartoon, similar to Max Fleischer’s Out of the Inkwell cartoons, Bosko, the Talk-Ink Kid that showcased their ability to animate soundtrack-synchronized speech and dancing. The short, plotless cartoon opens with live action footage of Ising at a drafting table. After he draws Bosko on the page, the character springs to life, talks, sings, and dances. Ising returns Bosko to the inkwell, and the short ends. This short is a landmark in animation history as being the first cartoon to predominantly feature synchronized speech, though Fleischer Studios’ Song Car-Tune My Old Kentucky Home was the first cartoon to contain animated dialogue a few years earlier. This cartoon set Harman and Ising “apart from early Disney sound cartoons because it emphasized not music but dialogue.” The short was marketed to various people by Harman and Ising until Leon Schlesinger offered them a contract to produce a series of cartoons for the Warner Bros. It would not be seen by a wide audience until 71 years later, in 2000, as part of Cartoon Network’s special Toonheads: The Lost Cartoons, a compilation special of rare material from the WB/Turner archives.

In his book, Of Mice and Magic, Leonard Maltin states that this early version of Bosko:

“was in fact a cartoonized version of a young black boy… he spoke in a Southern Negro dialect… in subsequent films this characterization was eschewed, or perhaps forgotten. This could be called sloppiness on the part of Harman and Ising, but it also indicates the uncertain nature of the character itself.”

Compote Collective (2018)

The prisoner strapped under a descending pendulum blade. A raven who refuses to leave the narrator’s chamber. A beating heart buried under the floorboards. Poe’s macabre and innovative stories of gothic horror have left a timeless mark on literature. But just what is it that makes Edgar Allan Poe one of the greatest American authors? Scott Peeples investigates.

Lesson by Scott Peeples.

Directed by Compote Collective.