Mark Hall & Chris Taylor (1983)

Toad (David Jason), Rat (Ian Carmichael), Mole (Richard Pearson), and Badger (Sir Michael Hordern) follow animal etiquette in this version of Kenneth Grahame’s classic, in stop-motion model animation.

The Wind in the Willows is a 1983 British stop motion animated film produced by Cosgrove Hall Films for Thames Television and aired on the ITV network. The film is based on Kenneth Grahame’s classic 1908 novel The Wind in the Willows. It won a BAFTA award and an international Emmy award.

Between 1984 and 1990, Cosgrove-Hall subsequently made a 52-episode television series, with the film serving as a pilot. The film’s music and songs are composed by Keith Hopwood, late of Herman’s Hermits, and Malcolm Rowe. The Stone Roses guitarist John Squire worked on the series as a set artist.

Aardman Animations (1982)

A real radio presenter provides the voice for his animated counterpart, a weary soul who doesn’t let a small thing like hosting a radio show get in the way of his morning routine…

Commissioned by Channel 4 in 1982, Conversation Pieces allowed Peter Lord and Dave Sproxton to develop ideas aimed at a more sophisticated, adult audience. The 5-minute shorts also gave birth to a device that has become an Aardman trademark – matching animated characters to real-life dialogue.

Aardman Animations, Ltd. is a British animation studio based in Bristol, England. It is known for films made using stop-motion clay animation techniques, particularly those featuring its Plasticine characters Wallace and Gromit, Shaun the Sheep, and Morph.

Learn more about Aardman Animations by visiting https://www.aardman.com/about/

Richard Williams (2015)

Richard Williams was a Canadian–British animator, voice actor, director, and writer, best known for serving as animation director on Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, for which he won two Academy Awards, and for his unfinished feature film The Thief and the Cobbler.

In 2015 his short film Prologue received both an Oscar nomination and a BAFTA nomination in the category of best animated short. Prologue is actually the first 6 minutes of his hand-drawn feature film Lysistrata, based on the ancient Greek comedy by Aristophanes, which Williams joked should be sub-titled “Will I Live to Finish It?” Williams described Prologue as “the only thing so far in my career that I’ve ever really been pleased with.” In 2013 Williams told The Guardian, “All I need is some time and five or six assistants who can draw like hell.” The film was intended to be “grim but funny and salacious and sexy”. Like The Thief and the Cobbler, Prologue would never be completed. But, as Williams put it: “it’s the doing of it that matters. Do it for the love of it. That’s all there is”.

To see more work by Richard Williams follow the links below…

Barnaby Dixon (2009)

A tale of how two “disgrega workers” react to the presence of a wild animal in their workshop.

Barnaby Dixon is a puppeteer, animator, musician, singer, YouTube star, and social media personality from Britain. He has garnered fame through his self-titled YouTube channel, on which he posts his puppet performances. His ongoing comedy/vlog series with a bird puppet named Dabchick has brought him widespread recognition.

Barnaby Dixon is a producer and director, known for Once Upon a Time in a Shed (2013), Eskos (2009), and The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance (2019).

John Halas & Joy Batchelor (1954)

Britain’s second animated feature, which, despite the title and Disney-esque animal animation, is in fact a no-holds-barred adaptation of George Orwell’s classic satire on Stalinism, with the animals taking over their farm by means of a revolutionary coup, but then discovering that although all animals are supposed to be equal, some are more equal than others.

Animal Farm was written by George Orwell in 1945. It is an allegorical novella, first published in England. The book tells the story of a group of farm animals who rebel against their human farmer, hoping to create a society where the animals can be equal, free, and happy.