“Weird Al” Yankovic (2016)

Straight Outta Lynwood is the twelfth studio album by “Weird Al” Yankovic, released on September 26, 2006. It was the sixth studio album self-produced by Yankovic. The musical styles on the album are built around parodies and pastiches of pop and rock music of the mid-2000s. The album’s lead single, White & Nerdy, is a parody of Chamillionaire’s hit single Ridin’. The single peaked at number nine on the Billboard Hot 100; Canadian Idiot, a parody of Green Day’s American Idiot, also charted, peaking at number 82. The album contains three further parodies, based on Confessions Part II by Usher, Do I Make You Proud by Taylor Hicks, and Trapped in the Closet by R. Kelly. The other half of the album is original material, containing many “style parodies”—musical imitations of existing artists, such as Brian Wilson, Rage Against the Machine, Sparks, animated musical specials, Cake, and 1980s charity songs.

Gorillaz (2018)

Tranz debuted—alongside three others—on June 1st, 2018, at the Rock im Park festival in NĂŒrnberg. It is the second-listed track on Gorillaz’s sixth studio album, The Now Now, which has since released on June 29, 2018.
A music video was released on September 13th, 2018.

Director: Jamie Hewlett

Co-director: Nicos Livesey

Executive Producer: Bart Yates

Producer: Georgina Fillmore

Gorillaz are managed by Eleven Management.

Production Company: Blinkink

Production Company: Eddy

Executive Producers Eddy: Emilie Walmsley, Lars Wagner

Production Coordinator: Maria Kolandawel

Production Manager Eddy: Stella Ramsden

Line Producer: Fabien Cellier

Production Assistants: Lina Houari, Agathe Derosier

Director of Photography: Max Halstead

1st Camera Assistant: Toby Goodyear

Editor: Paul Moth

Animation by: Brunch

Lead Animator: Romain Barriaux

Storyboard and Layout: Julien Perron

Animation: Romain Barriaux, Julien Perron, Leo Schweitzer, Martin Richard, Paul Nivet, Magali Garnier, LĂ©onard Bismuth, Simon Duong van Huyen, Mathilde Loubes, Victor Chagniot (work experience)

Animation Clean-up: Mathilde Loubes, Antoine Carré

Colour and Shadow animation: Meton Joffily d’Alençar, Rohit Kelkar, Antoine CarrĂ©, Constance Bertoux

Compositing: Vincent Ewald

Compositing assistant: Ekin Koca

3D Animators: Erik Ferguson, Oliver Latta, Marco Mori

Analog Synth: Michael Knight

Animation Clips: Lee Hardcastle, Macomoroni, Extraweg, Fergemanden

Animatic: Simone Ghilardotti

Sound FX: Offset Audio

Pearl Jam (2020)

Superblood Wolfmoon is a song by American alternative rock band Pearl Jam. The song was released on February 18, 2020, as the second single from their eleventh studio album, Gigaton (2020).

Created by: Tiny Concert

Director: Keith Ross

Video Producer: Scott Greer

Post Production: PB&I

Post Producers: Todd Broder, Ryan Duff, Amit Macker

Editor: Gino Gianoli

Studio artist: Joan Heo

Artist Consultant: Talia Handler

Superblood Wolfmoon
Took her away too soon
Superblood Wolfmoon

Took her away too soon

I can hear you singin’ in the distance
I can see you when I close my eyes
Once, you were somewhere and now you’re everywhere
I’m feeling selfish and I want what’s right
I ask for forgiveness
I beg of myself
Feeling every night that I see

Right now I feel a lack of innocence
Searchin’ for reveal hypnotonic residence
I feel not much of anything
And the cause is life or death
A life of hopelessness, focus on you focusness
I’ve been hopin’ and I hope that lasts
I don’t know anything, I question everything
This life I love is going way too fast

Both my eyes are swollen, my face is broken
And I’m hope that I hurt you
Hope that I hurt you
Hope that I hurt you

She was a stunner and I am stunned
And the first thought or second thought “could be the one”
I was a prisoner of keys and the cuffs
Yeah, I was feeling fortunate to be locked up

But the world got to spinnin’
Always felt like it was endin’
And love right, it was standin’
We are each of us

I can hear you singin’ in the distance
I can see you when I close my eyes
Once, you were somewhere and now you’re everywhere
I’m feeling selfish and I want what’s right

I ask for forgiveness
I beg of myself
Feelin’ angry
Now, get off the stage

Superblood Wolfmoon
Took her away too soon
Superblood Wolfmoon
Took her away too soon
Superblood Wolfmoon
Took her away too soon

I can hear you singin’ in the distance
I can see you when I close my eyes
Once, you were somewhere and now you’re everywhere
I’m feeling selfish and I want what’s right
Focus on you focusness, turn around for hopelessness
I’ve been hopin’ and all hope was lost
I don’t know anything, I question everything
This life I love is going way too fast

Run the Jewels feat. Lil Bub, Maceo, Delonte

Directed and animated by Cyriac (2016)

Official music video for “Meowpurrdy” from the Meow The Jewels album by Run The Jewels. Featuring Lil Bub, Maceo, and Delonte.

Animated by British artist Cyriak, the clip features a beastly, three-eyed cat, around which a kaleidoscopic collection of smaller cats gather, multiply and morph extra eyes, legs, tails and heads. This frightening feline, however, is no match for an angelic gray tabby, who descends from the sky and destroys the beast by being swallowed and coughed back up like an explosive hairball.

Killer Mike and El-P have donated all earnings from Meow the Jewels directly to the families of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, two high-profile victims of police brutality. Additional profits have gone to the National Lawyers Guild’s Mass Defense Committee.

a-ha (1984)

At the 1986 MTV Video Music Awards, the video for Take On Me won six awards—Best New Artist in a Video, Best Concept Video, Most Experimental Video, Best Direction, Best Special Effects, and Viewer’s Choice—and was nominated for two others, Best Group Video and Video of the Year. “Take On Me” was also nominated for Favorite Pop/Rock Video at the 13th American Music Awards in 1986.

Take On Me is a song by Norwegian synth-pop band A-ha, first released in 1984. The original version was produced by Tony Mansfield and remixed by John Ratcliff. A new version was released in 1985 and produced by Alan Tarney for the group’s debut studio album Hunting High and Low (1985). The song combines synthpop with a varied instrumentation that includes acoustic guitars, keyboards, and drums. It is considered to be the band’s signature song.

A-ha released a less slick version of the song in 1984, but redid the tune after it proved to be a commercial flop. And despite releasing a revised rendition in 1985, Waaktaar-Savoy says, “it took, like, four months to reach number one in America. And it felt like years. Every week it would go up a spot, up three spots
. It would pick up, then slow down. [It] was a whole process.”

They teamed up with director Steve Barron, who directed Michael Jackson’s Billie Jean, for a short-form piece that mixed live action with rotoscope animation — never before used in a music video. “It was a dream to work with talent like that,” Waaktaar-Savoy says of Barron. “Normally, videos took a week of shooting in a hangar. But for this, we did a whole day that was only to make the comic magazine. Then four months spent doing hand-drawn drawings. It was very thorough stuff.” Illustrator Mike Patterson drew more than 3,000 sketches for the final clip.

Weezer (2019)



Weezer had teamed with Calpurnia – the indie rock band led by Stranger Things‘ Finn Wolfhard – for a nostalgic new video for their cover of a-ha’s Take On Me. The track appears on Weezer’s self-titled covers record, also known as The Teal Album.

Jerry Garcia & the Grateful Dead (1977)

UNLOCKED! Enjoy The Grateful Dead Movie and please donate to Feeding America if you can.

Jerry Garcia directs this concert film of highlights from the five-night run at San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom that capped off the Grateful Dead’s 1974 tour. The film is distinguished among concert films for its unusual focus on the band’s fans and their often extreme commitment to the Deadhead lifestyle. The documentary also features interviews with band members, including Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, and Phil Lesh, and includes a short but lively recap of the group’s history.

Pink Floyd (1982)

The segment in the film version is a full-length animated sequence of vivid colour and disturbing visuals; the animation was originally designed for the album’s concert performances, before being reworked for the film adaptation. Political cartoonist Gerald Scarfe directed the design for the sequence.

Pink Floyd: The Wall is a 1982 musical film directed by Alan Parker, based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall. The screenplay was written by Pink Floyd vocalist and bassist Roger Waters. Bob Geldof plays rock star Pink, who, driven into insanity by the death of his father, constructs a physical and emotional wall to protect himself.

Like the album, the film is highly metaphorical, and symbolic imagery and sound are present most commonly. The film is mostly driven by music and does not feature much dialogue. The film is best known for its imagery of mental isolation, drug use, war, fascism, dark or disturbing animated sequences, sexual situations, violence and gore. Despite its turbulent production and the creators voicing their discontent about the final product, the film received generally positive reviews and has an established cult following.

Patrick Smith (1988)

“When we fell in with the Acid Tests, we started having the most fun we had ever had.”

Jerry Garcia

Interview by Joe Smith on May 23, 1988 by use of cassette tape, and recorded during the writing of Off the Record.

Hear the full interview catalog at The Library of Congress and check out blankonblank.org.

Music You Heard: Franklin’s Tower, Cream Puff War, Golden Road, and Friend of the Devil.

Run the Jewels featuring Boots (2015)

Killer Mike and El-P made their new RTJ4 album available in a bid to boost morale, citing the world as being “infected with bullshit” and concluding that their music might bring fans “some joy”.

El-P wrote in an Instagram post: “Fuck it, why wait. The world is infested with bullshit so here’s something raw to listen to while you deal with it all. We hope it brings you some joy. Stay safe and hopeful out there and thank you for giving 2 friends the chance to be heard and do what they love. With sincere love and gratitude, Jaime + Mike.”

Run the Jewels (2017)

Official music video for Don’t Get Captured by Run The Jewels, off the RTJ3 album.

El-P and Killer Mike of Run the Jewels are reborn as claymation characters in their new video for Don’t Get Captured, a grim meditation on abuses of power.

The two rappers are observers in the clip, rolling slowly through a dark, violent claymation landscape full of skeletons like in a haunted house. The skeleton world is ruled by a small cadre of self-satisfied politicians who wear top hats and smoke cigars. The video depicts gentrification, racial profiling by law enforcement and a biased court system that doles out lethal punishments. This gives extra force to Run the Jewels’ frequently repeated warning: “Don’t get captured.”

Directed by Chris Hopewell

Produced by Rosie Brind

Production Co: Jacknife Films

Executive Produced by Amaechi Uzoigwe

Killer Mike (2012)

The hyper-political R.A.P. Music track gets a hyper-political animated video.

Atlanta rapper Michael Santiago Render, known professionally as Killer Mike, released his sixth album this month. It’s called R.A.P. Music. The album’s title isn’t about hip-hop, per se, but refers to an acronym tweeted by another Georgian, a critic named Maurice Garland, two years ago. “He just put it up randomly: ‘Rap music is supposed to be Rebellious African People,’ ” Killer Mike told Morning Edition. “I said, ‘Yo, i’m naming my next album that.’ “

“First of all, all humanity is from Africa, and i think we’ve been trained to put color on it. But, in terms of the black people who were directly descended from Africa and brought here a few hundred years ago, that voice began in the fields as wailing, which turned into gospel. Gospel got secular and turned into blues, and blues got faster and became rock ‘n’ roll and became funk and became soul and R&B. What’s more American than young people speaking their mind over things they had to create over pots and pans and electronically because music was taken out of schools? What’s more American than making something out of nothing? What’s more gospel than rap music?”

Read the remainder of the NPR article here: https://www.npr.org/2012/06/19/155308252/killer-mike-on-ronald-reagan-and-raising-daughters

Modest Mouse (2009)

King Rat is a song by indie rock band Modest Mouse and appears as the title track to their fifth promotional single, following The World At Large. The single was later released on the band’s 2009 EP No One’s First, and You’re Next.