Louie Anderson & Matthew O’Callaghan (1994)

Sadly, Louie Anderson passed away on January 21, 2022. Louie Anderson has always reminded me of my childhood and spending time with my younger brothers in our first family home. When I heard of his passing a flood of memories came washing over me. Unfortunately, I was unable to post something in his honor on the day of his passing, but here’s something to remember Louie by and maybe your childhood too.

Life with Louie is an American animated television series. The show is based on the childhood of well-known stand-up comedian Louie Anderson, growing up with his family in the town of Cedar Knoll, Wisconsin during the early 1960s, although Anderson himself was actually from Saint Paul, Minnesota, also situated in midwestern US.

The first two episodes aired in primetime on Fox in late 1994, before moving to Saturday morning on Fox Kids from 1995 to 1998. Although not that popular in the U.S., Life with Louie achieved cult status in some countries in Eastern Europe where Fox Kids was a popular TV channel during the 1990s and early 2000s, most notably Romania and in Turkey.

Born one of 11 children in St. Paul, Minnesota, Anderson was a counselor for troubled children when he won a the first–place trophy at the 1981 Midwest Comedy Competition.

The host of the competition, legendary comedian Henny Youngman, was so impressed that he hired the young comic as a writer.

Anderson was soon basking in his own spotlight on comedy stages all over the country.Johnny Carson invited Anderson to make his national television debut on the “The Tonight Show” in 1984 and Anderson’s career took off.

Appearances with Jay Leno, David Letterman, “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson,” “Comic Relief,” as well as Showtime and HBO specials further cemented him as one of Hollywood’s top comedians.

Louie Anderson explains how his tough childhood led him to comedy (1989)

But it was hosting the beloved game show “Family Feud” in 1999 that made Anderson a household name and opened doors for him into acting.

Robert Smigel & J. J. Sedelmaier (2011)

Happy Pride Month!

Ace and Gary team up to fight crime in their usual, awkward fashion.

Bighead and his henchmen blast Ace and Gary with a flesh ray, transforming them from animated characters to live-action ones, in which they are portrayed by Jon Hamm and Jimmy Fallon, respectively. The gun malfunctions and “unanimates” everyone, with Ed Helms playing Half-Scary, Fred Armisen as Lizardo, Stephen Colbert as Dr. Brainio, and Steve Carell as Bighead.

The Ambiguously Gay Duo is an American animated comedy sketch that debuted on The Dana Carvey Show before moving to its permanent home on Saturday Night Live.

The Ambiguously Gay Duo follows the adventures of Ace and Gary, voiced by Stephen Colbert and Steve Carell, two superheroes whose sexual orientation is a matter of dispute, and a cavalcade of characters preoccupied with the question.

The Ambiguously Gay Duo is a parody of the stereotypical comic book superhero duo done in the style of Saturday morning cartoons like Super Friends. The characters are clad in matching pastel turquoise tights, dark blue domino masks, and bright yellow coordinated gauntlets, boots and shorts. The shorts were intended to satirize suggestions that early Batman comics implied a homosexual relationship between the eponymous title character and his field partner and protégé Robin, a charge most infamously leveled by Fredric Wertham in his 1954 book, Seduction of the Innocent, the research methodology for which was later discredited.

The typical episode usually begins with the duo’s arch-nemesis Bighead, a criminal mastermind with an abnormally large cranium. Bighead is usually briefing his henchmen on a plot for some grandiose plan for world domination, interrupted by a debate as to whether or not Ace and Gary are gay. Once the crime is in process, the police commissioner calls on the superheroes to save the day, often engaging in similar debates with the chief of police.

Ace and Gary set out to foil the evil plan, but not before calling attention to themselves with outrageous antics and innuendo, and behaving in ways perceived by other characters to be stereotypically homosexual.