Hobo Moon Cartoons specializes in working with clients and developing animation from their concepts, creating storyboards that depict the script and narrative, designing characters and sets, logo design, video editing, use of technical software, as well as working toward production deadlines and meeting clients’ commercial requirements.

Aaron McGruder & Kalvin Lee (2006)

Happy Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day!

Return of the King is the ninth episode of the first season of the animated television series The Boondocks. It originally aired in the United States on Cartoon Network’s late-night programming block Adult Swim on January 15, 2006. The episode’s name was taken from The Lord of the Rings volume The Return of the King. It won a Peabody Award in 2006.

“I want young men and young women who are not alive today to know and see that these new privileges and opportunities did not come without somebody suffering and sacrificing for them.”

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Return of the King was the most controversial episode of The Boondocks’s first season. The episode received criticism from Al Sharpton for depicting Martin Luther King Jr. using the term “nigga.” He demanded an apology from Aaron McGruder and Cartoon Network, stating “Cartoon Network must apologize and also commit to pulling episodes that desecrate black historic figures. We are totally offended by the continuous use of the n-word in McGruder’s show.”

Cartoon Network replied by releasing a statement saying, “We think Aaron McGruder came up with a thought-provoking way of not only showing Dr. King’s bravery but also of reminding us of what he stood and fought for, and why even today, it is important for all of us to remember that and to continue to take action.” McGruder himself responded to Sharpton’s criticism in The Boondocks comic strip, by having the characters ridicule the activist’s choice to attack a cartoon over other, more relevant issues. The characters in the strip never specify the cartoon to which they’re alluding. The incident was also referenced on the show, in the episode The Block is Hot. While Huey listens to an internet radio station, the broadcaster mentions Sharpton: “Folks, this heat will not let up, it is hot! Speaking about hot, Al Sharpton is hot right now. Havin’ a big ole protest. Seems his anger again has something to do with — I think it’s a cartoon this time.”

Written and created by Aaron McGruder.

Let us remember Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. today and all he worked for as we continue the fight for voting rights across America in the year of our Lord 2022.

Norman Ferguson, Jack Kinney, John Elliotte, Wilfred Jackson, Bill Roberts, Ben Sharpsteen, Samuel Armstrong (1941)

Meet Dumbo, Mrs. Jumbo’s sweet little “Baby Mine” who charms all who see him, until it’s discovered that he has huge floppy ears! With the support of his very best friend, Timothy the mouse, Dumbo soon learns that his spectacular ears make him unique and special, allowing him to soar to fame as the world’s only flying elephant.

In 1941, in order to compensate for the relative poor box office of Pinocchio and Fantasia, Disney produced a low-budget feature film, Dumbo. Dumbo was a major hit and today is one of the most critically acclaimed animated movies ever made. Just a few days after rough animation was complete on Dumbo, the Disney animators’ strike broke out. This was caused by the Screen Cartoonists’ Guild, who severed many ties between Walt Disney and his staff, while encouraging many members of the Disney studio to leave and seek greener pastures. Later that year, Dumbo became a big success, the first time since Snow White. The critically acclaimed film brought in much-needed revenue and kept the studio afloat.

Dumbo is a 1941 American animated film produced by Walt Disney Productions and released by RKO Radio Pictures. The fourth Disney animated feature film, it is based upon the storyline written by Helen Aberson and Harold Pearl illustrated by Helen Durney for the prototype of a novelty toy. The main character is Jumbo Jr., a semi-anthropomorphic elephant who is cruelly nicknamed “Dumbo”, as in “dumb”. He is ridiculed for his big ears, but in fact he is capable of flying by using his ears as wings. Throughout most of the film, his only true friend, aside from his mother, is the mouse, Timothy – a relationship parodying the stereotypical animosity between mice and elephants.

Dumbo was released on October 23, 1941; made to recoup the financial losses of Fantasia, it was a deliberate pursuit of simplicity and economy for the Disney studio. At 64 minutes, it is one of Disney’s shortest animated features. Sound was recorded conventionally using the RCA System. One voice was synthesized using the Sonovox system, but it, too, was recorded using the RCA System.

In 2017, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

A live-action adaptation of the film directed by Tim Burton is scheduled to be released on March 29, 2019.

Written by Otto Englander, Bill Peet, Joe Grant, Joe Rinaldi, Aurelius Battaglia, Harold Pearl, Helen Aberson, Webb Smith, Vernon Stallings, and Dick Huemer.

Starring Edward Brophy, Billy Bletcher, Malcolm Hutton, John McLeish, Verna Felton, Eddie Holden, The King’s Men, James Baskett, Jim Carmichael, Harold Manley, Noreen Gammill, Hall Johnson Choir, Sterling Holloway, Cliff Edwards, Verna Felton, and Herman Bing.

Al Brodax & Sylban Buck (1965)

I never knew this cartoon even existed. It’s pretty bad, but still kinda fun to watch.

The Beatles is a Saturday morning animated television series featuring representations of the popular English rock band of the same name. It was originally broadcast from 1965 to 1969 on ABC in the USA. The series debuted on 25 September 1965 and new episodes ended on 21 October 1967. Each episode is named after a Beatles song and based on its lyrics. The series was a historical milestone as the first weekly television series to feature animated versions of real, living people.

Pathé (1907)

Le Cochon Danseur (The Dancing Pig) is a silent, 4 minute long, black-and-white burlesque film released in 1907 by French company Pathé, apparently based on a Vaudeville act. In the film, a giant anthropomorphic pig, dressed in fancy clothes, dances with a girl, who later embarrasses him by tearing his clothes off. The two start to dance together, then walk into the curtains behind them. In the infamous final scene, the pig moves his tongue and eyes around and then bare his teeth, possibly in an attempt to show the puppet’s mechanical abilities.

The film had fallen into obscurity for over a century, but gained more notoriety around 2007. It has now become an Internet meme and creepypasta, with Clarisse Loughrey stating that the film “will definitely be entering into your nightmares tonight.”

The Dancing Pig is the titular main antagonist of Le cochon danseur. He is an anthropomorphic pig with sharp, predatory fangs.

The pig has been used as a popular Internet meme villain and has become popular on the Internet since 2007.

At first, the pig acts as a rude, greedy, but voracious, gentleman to the woman, who takes his jacket off and reveals his body, thus embarrassing him. Pretty soon, they make up and dance together. Afterwards, they take a bow and go backstage.

At the end of the short film, the pig shows his true, evil nature when he is seen laughing evilly whilst flailing his tongue, rolling his eyes around, and showing his sharp teeth, suggesting that he killed the woman and ate her.

The Dancing Pig is an obese anthropomorphic pig. He wears a black jacket, a white shirt, a small top hat and no pants. His mouth is filled with sharp teeth.

Pathé Frères (1906)

A young girl is given her breakfast of milk and a biscuit by an elderly woman. When her beribboned cat comes up, she shares the meal with her. Later, the cat sticks her paw into a glass of milk and licks it off.

This is a French film that was filmed in October 1905 in Troyes France and released on April 1906.

The name of the director, the young girl, and the grandmother are all unknown.

The title of the film translates to Pussy’s Breakfast.

Watch the Sesame Street Muppets play a Tiny Desk Concert.

The news has stopped! Count von Count and the NPR kids count us down: 5 … 4 … 3 … 2 … 1!

And there they are at the Tiny Desk: Big Bird, Bert and Ernie, Rosita, Abby Cadabby and Cookie Monster, all singing about a sunny day and how everything is A-OK. The Sesame Street crew, including Elmo, Grover and other surprise guests, visited NPR’s headquarters in Washington, D.C., to celebrate Sesame Street’s 50 years of teaching the world its A-B-Cs, its 1-2-3s, how to be kind and how to be proud, all while spreading love and joy. Sesame Street has won more major awards than any other group to play the Tiny Desk, including 11 Grammys and 192 Emmys. There was a lot of love as the cast of Sesame Street got to meet NPR hosts and newscasters, who in turn got to geek out meeting their favorite Muppets and the creators behind the felt and fur. These folks include Matt Vogel, Sesame Street’s puppet captain and performer, and music director Bill Sherman.

I even got to sing with Grover. And I’ll also say, on a personal note, that this may well have been the hardest-working, most dedicated group of performers I’ve ever worked with. I’m so proud of these Muppets and so happy to celebrate all that they’ve meant to the world for these 50 years.

MUSICIANS — Leslie Carrara-Rudolph: Abby Cadabby, Penguin; Ryan Dillon: Elmo; Eric Jacobson: Bert, Grover, Oscar the Grouch; Peter Linz: Ernie, Herry Monster; Carmen Osbahr: Rosita; David Rudman: Cookie Monster; Matt Vogel: Big Bird, Count von Count, Mr. Johnson; John Deley: keys; Rob Jost: bass; Michael Croiter: drums

Ralph Bakshi (1986)

In 1985, Ralph Bakshi received a phone call from The Rolling Stones’ manager, Tony King, who told Bakshi that the band had recorded a cover of Bob & Earl’s “Harlem Shuffle”, and wanted Bakshi to direct the music video. He was told that the live-action shoot needed to be completed within one day (January 28, 1986) for it to be shown at the Grammy Awards.

Production designer Wolf Kroeger was forced to drastically compact his sets, and animation director and designer John Kricfalusi had to push his team, including Lynne Naylor, Jim Smith and Bob Jaques, to complete the animation within a few weeks.

The band’s arrival at the set was delayed by a snowstorm and several takes were ruined when the cameras crossed paths. Bakshi was forced to pay the union wages out of his own fees, and the continuity between Kricfalusi’s animation and the live-action footage did not match; however, the video was completed on time.

Mike Wallace & Patrick Smith (1958)

“If you want to preserve your power indefinitely, you have to get the consent of the ruled”

– Aldous Huxley

This is an interview by Mike Wallace that took place on May 18, 1958, from the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin, in which Huxley foretells a future when telegenic presidential hopefuls use television to rise to power, technology takes over, drugs grab hold, and frightful dictatorships rule us all.

“This is Aldous Huxley, a man haunted by a vision of hell on earth. Mr. Huxley wrote a Brave New World, a novel that predicted that some day the entire world would live under a frightful dictatorship. Today Mr. Huxley says that his fictional world of horror is probably just around the corner for all of us.”

– MIke wallace

“I’d rather be myself,” he said. “Myself and nasty. Not somebody else, however jolly.”

– Bernard Marx

*From the Aldous Huxley novel Brave New World published in 1932.

Animated by Patrick Smith

Neil Young & Crazy Horse (2021)

Director: DHLovelife

Producer: Gary Ward

Animation: @patriclekid – Micah Nelson

Production Company: Lost Planet

In the last decade or two, you generally know what’s coming when you hit play on a new Neil Young record. You know there will be a few sweet love-struck hymns that sound as if they’re being played in dusty Old West saloons or around campfires. You anticipate the songs that wax nostalgic about his childhood, and the ones that rage against the destructiveness and stupidity of mankind and the impact on the planet. You await those moments when he turns the volume knob up and makes his guitar sound like it’s sandblasting paint off an old shed

All those elements are in play in Barn, but the crucial difference is the presence of a reconstituted version of Crazy Horse, with recurring Young sideman Nils Lofgren replacing the retired Frank “Poncho” Sampedro. Young first reconvened his on-again, dismissed-again band for 2010’s underwhelming Colorado, but maybe they all just needed time to warm up. On Barn, cut in just a few days at a log-cabin structure in Colorado, the thunderous and ornery side of Young and the Horse revs up again, and sonically, at least, it’s akin to running into an old friend you haven’t seen face to face since the pre-pandemic days.

Read the remainder of the Rolling Stone article written by David Browne here: https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-album-reviews/neil-young-and-crazy-horse-more-barn-1266713/

John Lennon (1976)

Everybody’s talking and no one says a word

Everybody’s making love and no one really cares

There’s Nazis in the bathroom just below the stairs

Always something happening and nothing going on

There’s always something cooking and nothing in the pot

They’re starving back in China so finish what you got

-John Lennon

John Lennon (1969)

Today we celebrate the loving memory of John Lennon. Peace.

In 1969, a 14-year-old Beatle fanatic named Jerry Levitan snuck into John Lennon’s hotel room in Toronto and convinced him to do an interview. 38 years later, Levitan, director Josh Raskin and illustrators James Braithwaite and Alex Kurina have collaborated to create an animated short film using the original interview recording as the soundtrack. A spellbinding vessel for Lennon’s boundless wit and timeless message, I Met the Walrus was nominated for the 2008 Academy Award for Animated Short and won the 2009 Emmy for ‘New Approaches’ (making it the first film to win an Emmy on behalf of the internet).

On December 8, 1980, a young man named Mark David Chapman asked John Lennon for his autograph in New York. Hours later, he fired four hollow-point bullets into Lennon’s back — killing him almost instantly.

John Lennon’s death shocked the world. On December 8, 1980, the former Beatle was fatally shot outside of his Manhattan apartment building, The Dakota. In minutes, one of the most iconic rock stars was gone forever.

John Lennon (1986)

Design and characters based on drawings by John Lennon
Animation produced and directed by John Canemaker
Executive Producer: Yoko Ono
Copyright © 1986 Ono Video

On the evening of 8 December 1980, 41 years ago today, English musician John Lennon, formerly of the Beatles, was shot and fatally wounded in the archway of The Dakota, his residence in New York City. His killer was Mark David Chapman, an American Beatles fan who was incensed by Lennon’s lavish lifestyle and his 1966 comment that the Beatles were “more popular than Jesus”. Though he was killed many years ago, John Lennon lives on in the hearts of those he continue to be inspired by his music and teachings.